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Anxiety Disorders are Associated with Low Socioeconomic Status in Women but Not in Men
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9976-5342
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology. Univ Cagliari, Dept Biomed Sci, Italy.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9151-4319
Lausanne Univ Hosp, Dept Psychiat, Switzerland.
Lausanne Univ Hosp CHUV, Inst Social & Prevent Med, Switzerland..
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2017 (English)In: Women's health issues, ISSN 1049-3867, E-ISSN 1878-4321, Vol. 27, no 3, 302-307 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: We investigated to what extent the lifetime prevalence of anxiety disorders relates to negative economic changes, taking important lifestyle factors and unexpected life events into consideration. Methods: We included 3,695 participants recruited in the city of Lausanne (Switzerland), from the population-based CoLaus/PsyCoLaus study. The association between anxiety disorders, lifestyle factors, and life events related to income was investigated using binary logistic regression analyses correcting for demographic and clinical confounders. Results: Compared with men, women with anxiety disorders showed a significantly lower socioeconomic status (Mann-Whitney U = 56,318; p < .001) and reported a higher negative impact of substantial reduction of income (Mann-Whitney U = 68,531; p = .024). When performing adjusted analyses, low socioeconomic status (odd ratio, 0.87; p = .001) and negative impact of reduction of income (odd ratio, 1.01; p = .004) were associated significantly with anxiety disorders in women but not in men. Conclusion: Our results suggest that anxiety disorders aggravate already existing gender differences in economic conditions, and that women with anxiety need additional support to attain socioeconomic security similar to that of men.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 27, no 3, 302-307 p.
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Environmental Health and Occupational Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-329124DOI: 10.1016/j.whi.2017.01.001ISI: 000403781300008PubMedID: 28215982OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-329124DiVA: diva2:1148915
Funder
Swedish Society for Medical Research (SSMF)Swedish Research CouncilThe Swedish Brain Foundation
Available from: 2017-10-12 Created: 2017-10-12 Last updated: 2017-10-12Bibliographically approved

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Mwinyi, JessicaPisanu, ClaudiaSchiöth, Helgi B.

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