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Altered self-perception in adult survivors treated for a CNS tumor in childhood or adolescence: population-based outcomes compared with the general population
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2015 (English)In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 733-40Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Survivors of pediatric CNS tumors are at risk for persistent tumor/treatment-related morbidity, physical disability and social consequences that may alter self-perception, vital for self-identity, mental health and quality of survival. We studied the long-term impact of childhood CNS tumors and their treatment on the self-perception of adult survivors and compared outcomes with those of the general population.

METHODS: The cohort included 697 Swedish survivors diagnosed with a primary CNS tumor during 1982-2001. Comparison data were randomly collected from a stratified general population sample. Survivors and general population individuals were compared as regards self-perception in 5 domains: body image, sports/physical activities, peers, work, and family, and with a global self-esteem index. Within the survivor group, determinants of impact on self-perception were identified.

RESULTS: The final analyzed sample included 528 survivors, 75.8% of the entire national cohort. The control sample consisted of 995, 41% of 2500 addressed. Survivors had significantly poorer self-perception outcomes in domains of peers, work, body image, and sports/physical activities, and in the global self-perception measure, compared with those of the general population (all P < .001). Within the survivor group, female gender and persistent visible physical sequelae predicted poorer outcomes in several of the studied domains. Tumor type and a history of cranial radiation therapy were associated with outcomes.

CONCLUSION: An altered self-perception is a potential late effect in adult survivors of pediatric CNS tumors. Self-perception and self-esteem are significant elements of identity, mental health and quality of survival. Therefore, care and psychosocial follow-up of survivors should include measures for identifying disturbances and for assessing the need for psychosocial intervention.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 17, no 5, p. 733-40
Keywords [en]
adult survivors, childhood CNS tumors, late effects, self-esteem, self-identity
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-332188DOI: 10.1093/neuonc/nou289PubMedID: 25332406OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-332188DiVA, id: diva2:1152456
Available from: 2017-10-25 Created: 2017-10-25 Last updated: 2017-10-25

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Boman, Krister K
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