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Environmental and genetic modulation of the phenotypic expression of antibiotic resistance
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. (Mikrobiologi - Immunologi; Diarmaid Hughes)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7456-9182
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. (Mikrobiologi - Immunologi; Dan I Andersson)
2017 (English)In: FEMS Microbiology Reviews, ISSN 0168-6445, E-ISSN 1574-6976, Vol. 41, no 3, 374-391 p., fux004Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Antibiotic resistance can be acquired by mutation or horizontal transfer of a resistance gene, and generally an acquired mechanism results in a predictable increase in phenotypic resistance. However, recent findings suggest that the environment and/or the genetic context can modify the phenotypic expression of specific resistance genes/mutations. An important implication from these findings is that a given genotype does not always result in the expected phenotype. This dissociation of genotype and phenotype has important consequences for clinical bacteriology and for our ability to predict resistance phenotypes from genetics and DNA sequences. A related problem concerns the degree to which the genes/mutations currently identified in vitro can fully explain the in vivo resistance phenotype, or whether there is a significant additional amount of presently unknown mutations/genes (genetic 'dark matter') that could contribute to resistance in clinical isolates. Finally, a very important question is whether/how we can identify the genetic features that contribute to making a successful pathogen, and predict why some resistant clones are very successful and spread globally? In this review, we describe different environmental and genetic factors that influence phenotypic expression of antibiotic resistance genes/mutations and how this information is needed to understand why particular resistant clones spread worldwide and to what extent we can use DNA sequences to predict evolutionary success.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 41, no 3, 374-391 p., fux004
Keyword [en]
persisters, pan genome, epistasis, successful clones, heteroresistance, virulence
National Category
Microbiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-332901DOI: 10.1093/femsre/fux004ISI: 000402064900008PubMedID: 28333270OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-332901DiVA: diva2:1154929
Available from: 2017-11-06 Created: 2017-11-06 Last updated: 2017-11-06Bibliographically approved

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