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Ancient plant DNA in lake sediments
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1956-4757
Univ St Andrews, Dept Geog & Sustainable Dev, Sch Geog & Geosci, St Andrews KY16 9AL, Fife, Scotland.;Queens Univ Belfast, Marine Lab, Portaferry BT22 1LS, North Ireland..
Univ Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, Lab Ecol Alpine LECA, F-38000 Grenoble, France.;Univ Milan, Dept Biosci, I-20133 Milan, Italy..
UiT Arctic Univ Norway, Tromso Museum, NO-9037 Tromso, Norway..
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2017 (English)In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 214, no 3, 924-942 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recent advances in sequencing technologies now permit the analyses of plant DNA from fossil samples (ancient plant DNA, plant aDNA), and thus enable the molecular reconstruction of palaeofloras. Hitherto, ancient frozen soils have proved excellent in preserving DNA molecules, and have thus been the most commonly used source of plant aDNA. However, DNA from soil mainly represents taxa growing a few metres from the sampling point. Lakes have larger catchment areas and recent studies have suggested that plant a DNA from lake sediments is a more powerful tool for palaeofloristic reconstruction. Furthermore, lakes can be found globally in nearly all environments, and are therefore not limited to perennially frozen areas. Here, we review the latest approaches and methods for the study of plant aDNA from lake sediments and discuss the progress made up to the present. We argue that a DNA analyses add new and additional perspectives for the study of ancient plant populations and, in time, will provide higher taxonomic resolution and more precise estimation of abundance. Despite this, key questions and challenges remain for such plant aDNA studies. Finally, we provide guidelines on technical issues, including lake selection, and we suggest directions for future research on plant aDNA studies in lake sediments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 214, no 3, 924-942 p.
Keyword [en]
ancient plant DNA (aDNA), bioinformatics, environmental DNA (eDNA), high-throughput DNA sequencing, lake sediments, metabarcoding, pollen, shotgun sequencing, taphonomy
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-332900DOI: 10.1111/nph.14470ISI: 000402403900006PubMedID: 28370025OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-332900DiVA: diva2:1154938
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2013-D0568401
Available from: 2017-11-06 Created: 2017-11-06 Last updated: 2017-11-06Bibliographically approved

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