uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Internet delivered cognitive behavior therapy for antenatal depression: A randomised controlled trial
Karolinska Inst, Ctr Psychiat Res, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
Umea Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Psychiat, Umea, Sweden..
Orebro Univ, Univ Hlth Care Res Ctr, Fac Med & Hlth, Orebro, Sweden..
Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Children & Women, Huddinge, Sweden..
Show others and affiliations
2017 (English)In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 221, 56-64 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Major depression occurs in 5-10% of pregnancies and is associated with many negative effects for mother and child, yet treatment options are scarce. To our knowledge, this is the first published randomised controlled trial on Internet delivered Cognitive Behavior Therapy (ICBT) for this group. Objective: To test the efficacy of a pregnancy adapted version of an existing 10-week ICBT-program for depression as well as assessing acceptability and adherence Design: Randomised controlled trial. Setting: Online and telephone. Population or sample: Self-referred pregnant women (gestational week 10-28 at intake) currently suffering from major depressive disorder. Methods: 42 pregnant women (gestational week 12-28) with major depression were randomised to either treatment as usual (TAU) provided at their antenatal clinic or to ICBT as an add-on to usual care. Main outcome measures: The primary outcome was depressive symptoms measured with the Montgomery-Asberg depression rating scale-self report (MADRS-S). The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and measures of anxiety and sleep were used. Credibility, satisfaction, adherence and utilization were also assessed. Results: The ICBT group had significantly lower levels of depressive symptoms post treatment (p < 0.001, Hedges g = 1.21) and were more likely to be responders (i.e. achieve a statistically reliable improvement) (RR = 0.36; p = 0.004). Measures of treatment credibility, satisfaction, utilization, and adherence were comparable to implemented ICBT for depression. Limitations: Small sample size and no long-term evaluation. Conclusion: Pregnancy adapted ICBT for antenatal depression is feasible, acceptable and efficacious. These results need to be replicated in larger trials to validate these promising findings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 221, 56-64 p.
Keyword [en]
Depression, Pregnancy, Cognitive behavior therapy, Internet, Antenatal depression, Psychotherapy, Perinatal mental health, ehealth, Online
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-333738DOI: 10.1016/j.jad.2017.06.013ISI: 000406464200009PubMedID: 28628768OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-333738DiVA: diva2:1158327
Available from: 2017-11-20 Created: 2017-11-20 Last updated: 2017-11-20Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed
By organisation
Department of Psychology
In the same journal
Journal of Affective Disorders
Psychology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 14 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf