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Intake of milk or fermented milk combined with fruit and vegetable consumption in relation to hip fracture rates: A cohort study of Swedish women.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, ISSN 0884-0431, E-ISSN 1523-4681Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Milk products may differ in pro-oxidant properties and their effects on fracture risk could potentially be modified by the intake of foods with antioxidant activity. In the population-based Swedish Mammography Cohort study, we aimed to determine how milk and fermented milk combined with fruit and vegetable consumption are associated with hip fracture. Women born 1914-1948 (n=61 240) answered food frequency and lifestyle questionnaires in 1987-1990 and 38 071 women contributed with updated information in 1997. During a mean follow-up of 22 years, 5827 women had a hip fracture (ascertained via official register data). Compared with a low intake of milk (<1 glass/day) and a high intake of fruits and vegetables (≥5 servings/day), a high intake of milk (≥3 glasses/day) with a concomitant low intake of fruits and vegetables (<2 servings/day) resulted in a HR of 2.49 (95% CI, 2.03-3.05). This higher hip fracture rate among high consumers of milk was only modestly attenuated with a concomitant high consumption of fruit and vegetables (HR 2.14; 95% CI 1.69-2.71). The combination of fruits and vegetables with fermented milk (yogurt or soured milk) yielded a different pattern with lowest rates of hip fracture in high consumers: HR 0.81 (95% CI, 0.68-0.97) for ≥2 servings/day of fermented milk and ≥5 servings/day of fruits and vegetables compared with low consumption of both fruit and vegetables and fermented milk. We conclude that the amount and type of dairy products as well as fruit and vegetable intake are differentially associated with hip fracture rates in women. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017.
Keyword [en]
dairy, fruit, hip fracture, milk, vegetables
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-334436DOI: 10.1002/jbmr.3324PubMedID: 29083056OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-334436DiVA: diva2:1159635
Available from: 2017-11-23 Created: 2017-11-23 Last updated: 2017-12-21

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Michaëlsson, KarlWolk, AlicjaLemming, Eva WarensjöByberg, Liisa
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