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Membrane interactions and antimicrobial effects of layered double hydroxide nanoparticles
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy. Univ Copenhagen, Dept Pharm, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark..
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5236-9107
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5626-3959
Univ Queensland, Australian Inst Bioengn & Nanotechnol, St Lucia, Qld 4072, Australia..
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2017 (English)In: Physical Chemistry, Chemical Physics - PCCP, ISSN 1463-9076, E-ISSN 1463-9084, Vol. 19, no 35, p. 23832-23842Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Membrane interactions are critical for the successful use of inorganic nanoparticles as antimicrobial agents and as carriers of, or co-actives with, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). In order to contribute to an increased understanding of these, we here investigate effects of particle size (42-208 nm) on layered double hydroxide (LDH) interactions with both bacteria-mimicking and mammalian-mimicking lipid membranes. LDH binding to bacteria-mimicking membranes, extraction of anionic lipids, as well as resulting membrane destabilization, was found to increase with decreasing particle size, also translating into size-dependent synergistic effects with the antimicrobial peptide LL-37. Due to strong interactions with anionic lipopolysaccharide and peptidoglycan layers, direct membrane disruption of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria is suppressed. However, LDH nanoparticles cause size-dependent charge reversal and resulting flocculation of both liposomes and bacteria, which may provide a mechanism for bacterial confinement or clearance. Taken together, these findings demonstrate a set of previously unknown behaviors, including synergistic membrane destabilization and dual confinement/killing of bacteria through combined LDH/AMP exposure, of potential therapeutic interest.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ROYAL SOC CHEMISTRY , 2017. Vol. 19, no 35, p. 23832-23842
National Category
Basic Medicine
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URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-334755DOI: 10.1039/c7cp02701jISI: 000410585900026PubMedID: 28682360OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-334755DiVA, id: diva2:1160604
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2012-1842, 20121883Available from: 2017-11-27 Created: 2017-11-27 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved

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Malekkhaiat Häffner, SaraNyström, LinaNordström, RandiMalmsten, Martin

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