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Reported habitual intake of breakfast and selected foods in relation to overweight status among seven- to nine-year-old Swedish children.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics. (Agneta Yngve)
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2017 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, 1403494817724951Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

AIM: The aim of this study was to examine the reported frequency of breakfast intake and selected food and beverages in the investigated group of Swedish children in comparison with recommended intakes. Furthermore, the study analyses these food habits and some demographic and lifestyle factors in relation to overweight and obesity.

METHODS: This cross-sectional study builds on data collected in 2008 and 2010. Measured anthropometric data and parent questionnaire data were collected. A total of 2620 Swedish children (52.1% boys) aged seven to nine years were included.

RESULTS: The majority of parents reported that their children (95.4%) had breakfast every day. The majority of children had fresh fruit (84.7%) and vegetables (83.9%) most days a week. Only 1.6% of the children were reported to have fast food and 6.0% to have sugar containing soft drinks, four days a week or more. The prevalence of overweight including obesity (OW/OB) was 17.8% for boys, 18.6% for girls. The odds of being OW/OB was higher among those not having breakfast every day (odds ratio (OR) 1.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.20-2.96), drinking diet soft drink (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.52-4.42) and skimmed/semi-skimmed milk (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.37-2.36) four days a week or more. Parents being overweight and having low education levels were also related to a higher risk of their children being overweight.

CONCLUSIONS: The parental reports of children's food habits pointed at favourable eating patterns for most investigated children. Breakfast skipping, diet soft drinks and low-fat milk consumption were more frequent among OW/OB children. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine the causal relationships.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. 1403494817724951
Keyword [en]
Child growth, WHO Childhood Obesity Surveillance Initiative, breakfast, food habits
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Nutrition
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-335082DOI: 10.1177/1403494817724951PubMedID: 29160159OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-335082DiVA: diva2:1161508
Available from: 2017-11-30 Created: 2017-11-30 Last updated: 2017-11-30

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