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Does habitat specialization shape the evolutionary potential of wild bird populations?
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology. CNRS MNHN UPMC, Ctr Sci Conservat, UMR7204, Paris, France..
CNRS MNHN UPMC, Ctr Sci Conservat, UMR7204, Paris, France.;Univ Calif Berkeley, Dept Environm Sci Policy & Management, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
Univ Sydney, Sch Biol Sci, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
CNRS MNHN UPMC, Ctr Sci Conservat, UMR7204, Paris, France..
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 48, no 8, 1158-1165 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Because specialist species evolved in more temporally and spatially homogeneous environments than generalist species, they are supposed to experience less fluctuating selection. For this reason, we expect specialists to show lower overall genetic variation as compared to generalists. We also expect populations from specialist species to be smaller and more fragmented, with lower neutral genetic diversity. We tested these hypotheses by investigating patterns of genetic diversity along a habitat specialization gradient in wild birds, based on estimates of heritability, coefficients of variation of additive genetic variance, and heterozygosity available in the literature. We found no significant effect of habitat specialization on any of the quantitative genetic estimators but generalists had higher heterozygosity. This effect was mainly a consequence of the larger population size of generalists. Our results suggest that evolutionary potential does not differ at the population level between generalist and specialist species, but the trend observed in heterozygosity levels and population sizes may explain their difference in susceptibility to extinction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017. Vol. 48, no 8, 1158-1165 p.
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Evolutionary Biology Ecology
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URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-335248DOI: 10.1111/jav.01011ISI: 000408813800013OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-335248DiVA: diva2:1162256
Available from: 2017-12-04 Created: 2017-12-04 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved

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Martinossi-Allibert, I.

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