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Protecting unauthorized immigrant mothers improves their children's mental health
Stanford Univ, Dept Polit Sci, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Stanford Univ, Immigrat Policy Lab, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Stanford Univ, Grad Sch Business, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8214-9041
Stanford Univ, Immigrat Policy Lab, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. Stanford Univ, Immigrat Policy Lab, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.
Northwestern Univ, Pritzker Law Sch, Chicago, IL 60611 USA.;Northwestern Univ, Kellogg Sch Management, Chicago, IL 60611 USA..
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2017 (English)In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 357, no 6355, 1041-1044 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The United States is embroiled in a debate about whether to protect or deport its estimated 11 million unauthorized immigrants, but the fact that these immigrants are also parents to more than 4 million U.S.-born children is often overlooked. We provide causal evidence of the impact of parents' unauthorized immigration status on the health of their U.S. citizen children. The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program granted temporary protection from deportation to more than 780,000 unauthorized immigrants. We used Medicaid claims data from Oregon and exploited the quasi-random assignment of DACA eligibility among mothers with birthdates close to the DACA age qualification cutoff. Mothers' DACA eligibility significantly decreased adjustment and anxiety disorder diagnoses among their children. Parents' unauthorized status is thus a substantial barrier to normal child development and perpetuates health inequalities through the intergenerational transmission of disadvantage.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 357, no 6355, 1041-1044 p.
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-335204DOI: 10.1126/science.aan5893ISI: 000409455700045PubMedID: 28860206OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-335204DiVA: diva2:1163120
Note

Jens Hainmueller, Duncan Lawrence and Linna Martén contributed equally to this work.

Available from: 2017-12-06 Created: 2017-12-06 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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