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Severity of Airflow Obstruction in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): Proposal for a New Classification
UCL, Res Dept Primary Care & Populat Hlth, London, England..
Kaiser Permanente Ctr Hlth Res, Portland, OR USA..
Univ Cape Town, Dept Med, Div Pulmonol, Cape Town, South Africa..
UNSW, Woolcock Inst Med Res, Sydney, NSW, Australia.;UNSW, South Western Sydney Clin Sch, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
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2017 (English)In: COPD: Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, ISSN 1541-2555, E-ISSN 1541-2563, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 469-475Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Current classifications of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) severity are complex and do not grade levels of obstruction. Obstruction is a simpler construct and independent of ethnicity. We constructed an index of obstruction severity based on the FEV1/FVC ratio, with cut-points dividing the Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease (BOLD) study population into four similarly sized strata to those created by the GOLD criteria that uses FEV1. Wemeasured the agreement between classifications and the validity of the FEV1-based classification in identifying the level of obstruction as defined by the new groupings. We compared the strengths of association of each classification with quality of life (QoL), MRC dyspnoea score and the self-reported exacerbation rate. Agreement between classifications was only fair. FEV1-based criteria for moderate COPD identified only 79% of those with moderate obstruction and misclassified half of the participants with mild obstruction as having more severe COPD. Both scales were equally strongly associated with QoL, exertional dyspnoea and respiratory exacerbations. Severity assessed using the FEV1/FVC ratio is only in moderate agreement with the severity assessed using FEV1 but is equally strongly associated with other outcomes. Severity assessed using the FEV1/FVC ratio is likely to be independent of ethnicity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 14, no 5, p. 469-475
Keywords [en]
Epidemiological studies, GOLD classification, method comparison, spirometry
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-335535DOI: 10.1080/15412555.2017.1339681ISI: 000409549000003PubMedID: 28799856OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-335535DiVA, id: diva2:1163718
Available from: 2017-12-07 Created: 2017-12-07 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved

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Janson, Christer

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