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Evolution of brain region volumes during artificial selection for relative brain size
Department of Zoology, Stockholm Univ.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Mathematics.
Department of Zoology, Stockholm University.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2709-9541
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2017 (English)In: Evolution, ISSN 0014-3820, E-ISSN 1558-5646, Vol. 71, no 12, p. 2942-2951Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The vertebrate brain shows an extremely conserved layout across taxa. Still, the relative sizes of separate brain regions vary markedly between species. One interesting pattern is that larger brains seem associated with increased relative sizes only of certain brain regions, for instance telencephalon and cerebellum. Till now, the evolutionary association between separate brain regions and overall brain size is based on comparative evidence and remains experimentally untested. Here, we test the evolutionary response of brain regions to directional selection on brain size in guppies (Poecilia reticulata) selected for large and small relative brain size. In these animals, artificial selection led to a fast response in relative brain size, while body size remained unchanged. We use microcomputer tomography to investigate how the volumes of 11 main brain regions respond to selection for larger versus smaller brains. We found no differences in relative brain region volumes between large- and small-brained animals and only minor sex-specific variation. Also, selection did not change allometric scaling between brain and brain region sizes. Our results suggest that brain regions respond similarly to strong directional selection on relative brain size, which indicates that brain anatomy variation in contemporary species most likely stem from direct selection on key regions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 71, no 12, p. 2942-2951
National Category
Evolutionary Biology Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-335997DOI: 10.1111/evo.13373ISI: 000417567000013PubMedID: 28986929OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-335997DiVA, id: diva2:1164714
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 102 2013.0072Available from: 2017-12-11 Created: 2017-12-11 Last updated: 2018-03-08Bibliographically approved

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Zeng, Hong-LiÖhman-Mägi, CarolinePelckmans, Kristiaan

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