uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Building dampness and mold in European homes in relation to climate, building characteristics and socio-economic status: The European Community Respiratory Health Survey ECRHS II
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5174-6668
Ctr Res Environm Epidemiol CREAL, Barcelona, Spain.; IMIM Hosp del Mar, Municipal Inst Med Res, Barcelona, Spain.; CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain.
Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain.; Municipal Institute of Medical Research (IMIM-Hospital del Mar), Barcelona, Spain.; CIBER Epidemiologia y Salud Publica, (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain.
German Research Centre for Environmental Health, Institute of Epidemiology, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Neuherberg, Germany.
Show others and affiliations
2017 (English)In: Indoor Air, ISSN 0905-6947, E-ISSN 1600-0668, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 921-932Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We studied dampness and mold in homes in relation to climate, building characteristics and socio-economic status (SES) across Europe, for 7127 homes in 22 centers. A subsample of 3118 homes was inspected. Multilevel analysis was applied, including age, gender, center, SES, climate, and building factors. Self-reported water damage (10%), damp spots (21%), and mold (16%) in past year were similar as observed data (19% dampness and 14% mold). Ambient temperature was associated with self-reported water damage (OR=1.63 per 10°C; 95% CI 1.02-2.63), damp spots (OR=2.95; 95% CI 1.98-4.39), and mold (OR=2.28; 95% CI 1.04-4.67). Precipitation was associated with water damage (OR=1.12 per 100 mm; 95% CI 1.02-1.23) and damp spots (OR=1.11; 95% CI 1.02-1.20). Ambient relative air humidity was not associated with indoor dampness and mold. Older buildings had more dampness and mold (P<.001). Manual workers reported less water damage (OR=0.69; 95% CI 0.53-0.89) but more mold (OR=1.27; 95% CI 1.03-1.55) as compared to managerial/professional workers. There were correlations between reported and observed data at center level (Spearman rho 0.61 for dampness and 0.73 for mold). In conclusion, high ambient temperature and precipitation and high building age can be risk factors for dampness and mold in homes in Europe.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 27, no 5, p. 921-932
Keywords [en]
building characteristics, building dampness, climate, environment, indoor, mould, socio-economic status
National Category
Building Technologies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-336126DOI: 10.1111/ina.12375ISI: 000416048700007PubMedID: 28190279OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-336126DiVA, id: diva2:1165057
Available from: 2017-12-12 Created: 2017-12-12 Last updated: 2018-02-23Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Authority records BETA

Norbäck, Dan

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Norbäck, Dan
By organisation
Department of NeuroscienceOccupational and Environmental Medicine
In the same journal
Indoor Air
Building Technologies

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 32 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf