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Electrolytes for High-Brightness, High-Efficiency Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells: Going from Polymers to Oligomers
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The light-emitting electrochemical cell (LEC), comprising, e.g., a conjugated light-emitting polymer in combination with an electrolyte, offers a promise of cheap and versatile light emission in a simple single-layer device with little dependence on active layer geometry or electrode work functions [1]. The defining feature of the LEC is the presence of mobile ions in the active layer that enables in situ electrochemical doping and p-n junction formation, which gives the LEC a unique set of operational features that distinguishes it from, e.g., the OLED. This includes ion transport-limited turn-on kinetics [2] and an apparent trade-off between brightness and efficiency [3].

The mobile ions in an LEC may be provided by means of a polymer electrolyte, i.e., a salt solvated by a polymeric ion transporter, most typically the polyether PEO [2]. Here, we build upon our previous work on high-performance oligoether ion transporters [4] and explore ion transporters based on polycarbonate backbones. Using properly designed molecular structures, we demonstrate record-high current efficacy combined with long operational lifetimes and, most importantly, high-brightness operation. We further reveal distinct differences between polymeric and oligomeric ion transporters in terms of ion transport and phase compatibility and demonstrate how this affects the turn-on kinetics and device efficiency, paving the way for designing new generations of ion transporters for high-performance LECs using ion transporters beyond the polyether paradigm.

References

  1. (a) Fresta, E.; Costa, R. D. J. Mater. Chem. C 2017, 5, 5643–5675; (b) Tang, S.; Edman, L. Top. Curr. Chem. 2016, 374, 40.
  2. Mindemark, J.; Edman, L. J. Mater. Chem. C 2016, 4, 420–432.
  3. van Reenen, S. et al. Adv. Funct. Mater. 2015, 25, 3066–3073.
  4. Mindemark, J. et al. Chem. Mater. 2016, 28, 2618–2623.
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017.
National Category
Materials Chemistry Polymer Chemistry Physical Chemistry Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-336936OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-336936DiVA, id: diva2:1167582
Conference
The 15th Pacific Polymer Conference (PPC-15)
Available from: 2017-12-19 Created: 2017-12-19 Last updated: 2017-12-21

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