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Negative phenotypic and genetic correlation between natal dispersal propensity and nest-defence behaviour in a wild bird
Univ Aberdeen, Inst Biol & Environm Sci, Aberdeen, Scotland.;Univ Lausanne, Dept Ecol & Evolut, Lausanne, Switzerland..
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology. Univ Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Lab Biometrie & Biol Evolut, CNRS, Villeurbanne, France.
Univ Lausanne, Dept Ecol & Evolut, Lausanne, Switzerland.;Univ Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7178, IPHC, F-67000 Strasbourg, France..
Univ Aberdeen, Inst Biol & Environm Sci, Aberdeen, Scotland..
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2017 (English)In: Biology Letters, ISSN 1744-9561, E-ISSN 1744-957X, Vol. 13, no 7, article id 20170236Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Natural selection is expected to favour the integration of dispersal and phenotypic traits allowing individuals to reduce dispersal costs. Accordingly, associations have been found between dispersal and personality traits such as aggressiveness and exploration, which may facilitate settlement in a novel environment. However, the determinism of these associations has only rarely been explored. Here, we highlight the functional integration of individual personality in nest-defence behaviour and natal dispersal propensity in a long-lived colonial bird, the Alpine swift (Alms melba), providing insights into genetic constraints shaping the coevolution of these two traits. We report a negative association between natal dispersal and nest-defence (i.e. risk taking) behaviour at both the phenotypic and genetic level. This negative association may result from direct selection if risk-averseness benefits natal dispersers by reducing the costs of settlement in an unfamiliar environment, or from indirect selection if individuals with lower levels of nest defence also show lower levels of aggressiveness, reducing costs of settlement among unfamiliar neighbours in a colony. In both cases, these results highlight that risk taking is an important behavioural trait to consider in the study of dispersal evolution.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ROYAL SOCIETY , 2017. Vol. 13, no 7, article id 20170236
Keywords [en]
behavioural syndrome, heritability, personality trait, dispersal costs, settlement, Apus melba
National Category
Zoology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-335681DOI: 10.1098/rsb1.2017.0236ISI: 000409400700001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-335681DiVA, id: diva2:1167915
Available from: 2017-12-19 Created: 2017-12-19 Last updated: 2017-12-19Bibliographically approved

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