uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Maximum thermal limits of coral reef damselfishes are size dependent and resilient to near-future ocean acidification
Univ Tasmania, Inst Marine & Antarctic Studies, Hobart, Tas 7000, Australia.;CSIRO Agr & Food, Hobart, Tas 7000, Australia..
Univ Neuchatel, Inst Biol, CH-2000 Neuchatel, Switzerland..
Univ Neuchatel, Inst Biol, CH-2000 Neuchatel, Switzerland..
Show others and affiliations
2017 (English)In: Journal of Experimental Biology, ISSN 0022-0949, E-ISSN 1477-9145, Vol. 220, no 19, p. 3519-3526Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Theoretical models predict that ocean acidification, caused by increased dissolved CO2, will reduce the maximum thermal limits of fishes, thereby increasing their vulnerability to rising ocean temperatures and transient heatwaves. Here, we tested this prediction in three species of damselfishes on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Maximum thermal limits were quantified using critical thermal maxima (CTmax) tests following acclimation to either presentday or end-of-century levels of CO2 for coral reef environments (similar to 500 or similar to 1000 mu atm, respectively). While species differed significantly in their thermal limits, whereby Dischistodus perspicillatus exhibited greater CTmax (37.88 +/- 0.03 degrees C; N=47) than Dascyllus aruanus (37.68 +/- 0.02 degrees C; N=85) and Acanthochromis polyacanthus (36.58 +/- 0.02 degrees C; N=63), end-of-century CO2 had no effect (D. aruanus) or a slightly positive effect (increase in CTmax of 0.16 degrees C in D. perspicillatus and 0.21 degrees C in A. polyacanthus) on CTmax. Contrary to expectations, early-stage juveniles were equally as resilient to CO2 as larger conspecifics, and CTmax was higher at smaller body sizes in two species. These findings suggest that ocean acidification will not impair the maximum thermal limits of reef fishes, and they highlight the critical role of experimental biology in testing predictions of theoretical models forecasting the consequences of environmental change.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
COMPANY OF BIOLOGISTS LTD , 2017. Vol. 220, no 19, p. 3519-3526
Keywords [en]
Carbon dioxide, CO2, Critical thermal maximum, CTmax, Great Barrier Reef, Climate change, Climate warming, Thermal tolerance, Fish, Ontogeny
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-337122DOI: 10.1242/jeb.162529ISI: 000412240500021PubMedID: 28754716OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-337122DiVA, id: diva2:1168263
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2013-947Magnus Bergvall Foundation, 2014-00620Lars Hierta Memorial Foundation, FO2014-0659Available from: 2017-12-20 Created: 2017-12-20 Last updated: 2017-12-20Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Authority records BETA

Sundin, Josefin

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Sundin, Josefin
By organisation
Physiology
In the same journal
Journal of Experimental Biology
Biological Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 22 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf