uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Risk factors for appendiceal and colorectal peritoneal metastases
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Colorectal Surgery.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Colorectal Surgery.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Colorectal Surgery.
2018 (English)In: European Journal of Surgical Oncology, ISSN 0748-7983, E-ISSN 1532-2157, Vol. 44, no 7, p. 997-1005Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Early diagnosis to target minimal volume disease has received increased attention in the management of appendiceal and colorectal peritoneal metastases (PM). This study aimed to identify risk factors for appendiceal, colon and rectal PM.

Methods

Data were retrieved from the Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry for all patients undergoing bowel resection of appendiceal and colorectal tumours, in Sweden, 2007–2015. Risk factors for synchronous and metachronous PM were analysed with multivariate logistic and Cox proportional hazard regression models.

Results

Synchronous PM was most common in appendiceal cancer (23.5%), followed by colon (3.1%) and rectal (0.6%) cancer. The 5-year cumulative incidence was 9.0% for appendiceal, 2.5% for right colon, 1.8% for left colon and 1.2% for rectal cancer. In appendiceal cancer (n = 327), T4, N2, mucinous tumour, and non-radical surgery were associated with PM. In colon cancer (n = 24,399), synchronous PM were primarily associated with T4 (OR 18.37, 95% CI 8.12–41.53), T3 and N2 but also with N1, right-sided tumour, mucinous tumour, vascular and perineural invasion, female gender, age <60 and emergency surgery. These factors were also associated with metachronous PM. In rectal cancer (n = 10,394), T4 (OR 19.12, 95% CI 5.52–66.24), proximal tumour and mucinous tumour were associated with synchronous PM and T4 and mucinous tumour with metachronous PM.

Conclusions

This study shows that appendiceal cancer, right-sided colon cancer, advanced tumour and node stages and mucinous histopathology are the main high-risk features for PM and should increase the awareness of current or future PM.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 44, no 7, p. 997-1005
National Category
Surgery
Research subject
Surgery
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-340054DOI: 10.1016/j.ejso.2018.02.245ISI: 000437391100012000437391100012OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-340054DiVA, id: diva2:1177543
Funder
Swedish Cancer Society, 160411Available from: 2018-01-25 Created: 2018-01-25 Last updated: 2018-09-21Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Colorectal and appendiceal peritoneal metastases: From population studies to genetics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Colorectal and appendiceal peritoneal metastases: From population studies to genetics
2018 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Peritoneal dissemination of colorectal and appendiceal origin was previously considered the end-stage of malignant disease. Today, treatment with cytoreductive surgery (CRS) in combination with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) has prolonged survival and cured some patients with peritoneal metastases (PM). Unfortunately, a majority of patients still have fatal outcomes. In this thesis, colorectal and appendiceal PM were studied from a wide population-based perspective down to the detailed perspectives of histopathology and genetics, with the aim of further contributing to prolonged survival.

In Paper I, the heterogeneous histopathology of PM was investigated and a substantial proportion of patients undergoing CRS and HIPEC were found to have surgical specimens lacking neoplastic epithelium. These patients had a favourable prognosis and the results illustrate the importance of thorough analysing and reporting of histopathology for understanding differences in survival outcomes and for improving patient selection. In Paper II, the role of inflammation in colorectal and appendiceal carcinogenesis was investigated at a population-based level. Patients with non-surgical treatment of appendicitis had an increased incidence of cancer (especially of appendiceal and right-sided colon cancer) compared to the general population. This should be taken into consideration in the discussion of optimal management of patients with appendicitis. In Paper III, risk factors for PM were studied with the aim of aiding in the detection of PM at earlier stages. Appendiceal and right-sided colon cancer, advanced tumour and node stages, mucinous histopathology and vascular invasion were identified as high risk features for developing PM, and should increase awareness of potential PM. In Paper IV, genome-wide chromosomal copy number alterations of PM were explored and associated with prognosis after CRS and HIPEC. Colorectal PM exhibited a wide range of alterations of which copy number gain on parts of chromosome 1p and 15q were significantly associated with poor prognosis and have the potential to be used as prognostic molecular markers in the future.

In conclusion, this thesis provides new insights into the field of colorectal and appendiceal cancer and PM to be used for improved patient selection, early detection and prevention, ultimately contributing to improved survival.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2018. p. 67
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Medicine, ISSN 1651-6206 ; 1441
Keywords
Peritoneal metastases; Peritoneal carcinomatosis; Pseudomyxoma peritonei; Colorectal cancer; Appendiceal cancer; Cytoreductive surgery; HIPEC; Appendicitis
National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-340059 (URN)978-91-513-0266-9 (ISBN)
Public defence
2018-05-05, Grönwallsalen, Akademiska sjukhuset, ingång 70, bv, Uppsala, 09:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2018-04-12 Created: 2018-03-09 Last updated: 2018-04-24

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Enblad, MalinGraf, WilhelmBirgisson, Helgi

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Enblad, MalinGraf, WilhelmBirgisson, Helgi
By organisation
Colorectal Surgery
In the same journal
European Journal of Surgical Oncology
Surgery

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 12 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf