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Climate-driven build-up of temporal isolation within a recently formed avian hybrid zone.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0706-458x
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3058-0072
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
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2018 (English)In: Evolution, ISSN 0014-3820, E-ISSN 1558-5646, Vol. 72, no 2, p. 363-374Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Divergence in the onset of reproduction can act as an important source of reproductive isolation (i.e., allochronic isolation) between co-occurring young species, but evidence for the evolutionary processes leading to such divergence is often indirect. While advancing spring seasons strongly affect the onset of reproduction in many taxa, it remains largely unexplored whether contemporary spring advancement directly affects allochronic isolation between young species. We examined how increasing spring temperatures affected onset of reproduction and thereby hybridization between pied and collared flycatchers (Ficedula spp.) across habitat types in a young secondary contact zone. We found that both species have advanced their timing of breeding in 14 years. However, selection on pied flycatchers to breed earlier was weaker, resulting in a slower response to advancing springs compared to collared flycatchers and thereby build-up of allochronic isolation between the species. We argue that a preadaptation to a broader niche use (diet) of pied flycatchers explains the slower response to raising spring temperature, but that reduced risk to hybridize may contribute to further divergence in the onset of breeding in the future. Our results show that minor differences in the response to environmental change of co-occurring closely related species can quickly cause allochronic isolation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 72, no 2, p. 363-374
Keywords [en]
Competitive exclusion, ecological speciation, prezygotic isolation, reinforcement, speciation, temporal segregation
National Category
Evolutionary Biology Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-341102DOI: 10.1111/evo.13404ISI: 000424131100011PubMedID: 29214649OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-341102DiVA, id: diva2:1180783
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilAcademy of FinlandAvailable from: 2018-02-06 Created: 2018-02-06 Last updated: 2018-11-19Bibliographically approved

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McFarlane, S. ErynJones, WilliamWheatcroft, DavidÅlund, MurielleQvarnström, Anna

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