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Building mindfulness bottom-up: Meditation in natural settings supports open monitoring and attention restoration
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9970-9164
2018 (English)In: Consciousness and Cognition, ISSN 1053-8100, E-ISSN 1090-2376, Vol. 59, p. 40-56Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

 Mindfulness courses conventionally use effortful, focused meditation to train attention. In contrast, natural settings can effortlessly support state mindfulness and restore depleted attention resources, which could facilitate meditation. We performed two studies that compared conventional training with restoration skills training (ReST) that taught low-effort open monitoring meditation in a garden over five weeks. Assessments before and after meditation on multiple occasions showed that ReST meditation increasingly enhanced attention performance. Conventional meditation enhanced attention initially but increasingly incurred effort, reflected in performance decrements toward the course end. With both courses, attentional improvements generalized in the first weeks of training. Against established accounts, the generalized improvements thus occurred before any effort was incurred by the conventional exercises. We propose that restoration rather than attention training can account for early attentional improvements with meditation. ReST holds promise as an undemanding introduction to mindfulness and as a method to enhance restoration in nature contacts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 59, p. 40-56
Keywords [en]
Attention, Mindfulness, Meditation, Restoration, Training
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-341717DOI: 10.1016/j.concog.2018.01.008ISI: 000427810400005OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-341717DiVA, id: diva2:1182381
Available from: 2018-02-13 Created: 2018-02-13 Last updated: 2018-05-25Bibliographically approved

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Publisher's full texthttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1053810017303690

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Lymeus, FreddieLindberg, PerHartig, Terry

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