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Physical activity, sleep and risk of respiratory infections: A Swedish cohort study
Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.;Univ Milano Bicocca, Dept Stat & Quantitat Methods, Milan, Italy..
Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden..
Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden.;Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Nutr, Boston, MA USA..
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics. Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden.
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2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 1, article id e0190270Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives

Previous studies found higher levels of physical activity to be protective against infections and that short and long sleep negatively affects the immune response. However, these relationships remain debatable. We aimed to investigate if physical activity and sleep habits affect incidence of upper respiratory tract infections (URTI) in a prospective cohort study.

Methods

A total of 2,038 adults aged 25-64 years served as a random sample of the gainfully employed population of an industrial town in Sweden. Physical activity and sleep habits were estimated through self-reported questionnaires. Physical activity was expressed as metabolic energy turnover hours per day. Sleep was assessed as number of hours slept per night and its perceived quality. URTI outcome was prospectively self-reported during a 9-month follow-up period. Associations of physical activity and sleep with URTI were estimated using hurdle regression models adjusted for potential confounders.

Results

During 1,583 person-years 1,597 URTI occurred, resulting in an incidence of 1.01 infections/person-year (95% CI 0.96-1.06). The fitted regression models did not provide support for an association with physical activity or sleep habits. Factors positively associated with experiencing URTI were having children <= 6 years, female gender, higher education and treatment for allergy, asthma or lung cancer. Having children <= 6 years and female gender were related to a higher number of URTI among those experiencing URTI.

Conclusions

We did not find any association between physical activity, sleep duration or sleep quality and the occurrence of upper respiratory tract infections in adult Swedish population.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 13, no 1, article id e0190270
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-341498DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0190270ISI: 000419239900014OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-341498DiVA, id: diva2:1183809
Available from: 2018-02-19 Created: 2018-02-19 Last updated: 2018-02-19Bibliographically approved

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Winell, Henric

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