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The Rate of Seasonal Changes in Temperature Alters Acclimation of Performance under Climate Change
Lund Univ, Dept Biol, Evolutionary Ecol Unit, Solvegatan 12, S-22362 Lund, Sweden.;Univ Toronto, Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biol, 25 Willcocks St, Toronto, ON M5S 3B2, Canada..
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
2017 (English)In: American Naturalist, ISSN 0003-0147, E-ISSN 1537-5323, Vol. 190, no 6, p. 743-761Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

How the ability to acclimate will impact individual performance and ecological interactions under climate change remains poorly understood. Theory predicts that the benefit an organism can gain from acclimating depends on the rate at which temperatures change relative to the time it takes to induce beneficial acclimation. Here, we present a conceptual model showing how slower seasonal changes under climate change can alter species' relative performance when they differ in acclimation rate and magnitude. To test predictions from theory, we performed a microcosm experiment where we reared a mid- and a high-latitude damselfly species alone or together under the rapid seasonality currently experienced at 62 degrees N and the slower seasonality predicted for this latitude under climate change and measured larval growth and survival. To separate acclimation effects from fixed thermal responses, we simulated growth trajectories based on species' growth rates at constant temperatures and quantified how much and how fast species needed to acclimate to match the observed growth trajectories. Consistent with our predictions, the results showed that the midlatitude species had a greater capacity for acclimation than the high-latitude species. Furthermore, since acclimation occurred at a slower rate than seasonal temperature changes, the midlatitude species had a small growth advantage over the high-latitude species under the current seasonality but a greater growth advantage under the slower seasonality predicted for this latitude under climate change. In addition, the two species did not differ in survival under the current seasonality, but the midlatitude species had higher survival under the predicted climate change scenario, possibly because rates of cannibalism were lower when smaller heterospecifics were present. These findings highlight the need to incorporate acclimation rates in ecological models.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
UNIV CHICAGO PRESS , 2017. Vol. 190, no 6, p. 743-761
Keywords [en]
temperature, climate change, seasonality, acclimation, growth rate, survival
National Category
Developmental Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-342663DOI: 10.1086/694412ISI: 000415995200005OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-342663DiVA, id: diva2:1186168
Funder
Swedish Research Council FormasSwedish Research CouncilAvailable from: 2018-02-27 Created: 2018-02-27 Last updated: 2018-02-27Bibliographically approved

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Johansson, Frank

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