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Effects of Coexisting Asthma and Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Sleep Architecture, Oxygen Saturation, and Systemic Inflammation in Women
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology. (Clinical Physiology)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
2018 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine (JCSM), ISSN 1550-9389, E-ISSN 1550-9397, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 253-259Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

STUDY OBJECTIVES: Both asthma and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are strongly associated with poor sleep. Asthma and OSA also have several features in common, including airway obstruction, systemic inflammation, and an association with obesity. The aim was to analyze the effect of asthma, OSA, and the combination of asthma and OSA on objectively measured sleep quality and systemic inflammation.

METHODS: Sleep and health in women is an ongoing community-based study in Uppsala, Sweden. Three hundred eighty-four women ages 20 to 70 years underwent overnight polysomnography and completed questionnaires on airway diseases and sleep complaints. C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor α were analyzed.

RESULTS: = .04) than the group with OSA alone. The results were consistent after adjusting for age, body mass index, and smoking status. Asthma was independently associated with lower oxygen saturation, whereas OSA was not.

CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate that coexisting asthma and OSA are associated with poorer sleep quality and more profound nocturnal hypoxemia than either of the conditions alone. The results are similar to earlier findings related to OSA and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, but they have not previously been described for asthma.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Academy of Sleep Medicine , 2018. Vol. 14, no 2, p. 253-259
Keywords [en]
OSA, asthma, inflammation, polysomnography
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-343517DOI: 10.5664/jcsm.6946ISI: 000425136900013PubMedID: 29394961OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-343517DiVA, id: diva2:1186262
Available from: 2018-02-27 Created: 2018-02-27 Last updated: 2018-04-11Bibliographically approved

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Sundbom, FredrikJanson, ChristerMalinovschi, AndreiLindberg, Eva

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