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Language Education Policies and the Indigenous and Minority Languages of Northernmost Scandinavia and Finland
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
2016 (English)In: Language Policy and Political Issues in Education / [ed] Teresa McCarty, Stephen May, New York: Springer International Publishing , 2016, 3, p. 367-381Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Three Nordic countries, Norway, Sweden, and Finland, share a very similar history as regards to language policies targeting their northernmost Indigenous and minority peoples. The Sámi in all three countries, the Tornedalians in Sweden, and the Kven in Norway all experienced an early history of a rather laissez-faire policy followed by a long period of forced assimilation, the main assimilative force being the public school system. Especially in Sweden and Norway, the speakers of these languages were also targets of social Darwinist theories, which labeled these peoples both physically and mentally inferior to the higher-standing Scandinavians. The 1970s finally marked the end of assimilation policies in the three Nordic countries. Schools in Sweden and Norway took the first steps of promoting the instruction of Finnish as an optional subject for Tornedalian and Kven pupils. The ethnopolitical Sámi movement had been gaining strength, and during the 1970s, the official view on the Indigenous Sámi and their languages had become more positive in all three countries. Securing the maintenance of Sámi language and culture became the responsibility of the compulsory school system. Today, official language acquisition planning in Norway, Sweden, and Finland includes explicit protection and promotion of Indigenous and minoritized languages, regarded as part of the national heritage of these countries. This chapter provides a brief description of previous and ongoing research on these issues as well as specific questions connected to this research and its policy implications. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Springer International Publishing , 2016, 3. p. 367-381
Series
Encyclopedia of Language and Education
Keywords [en]
Minority languages, indigenous languages, assimilation policies, revitalization, Scandinavia, Finland
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Research subject
Linguistics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-344003DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-02344-1_28ISBN: 978-90-481-9460-5 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-344003DiVA, id: diva2:1187444
Available from: 2018-03-05 Created: 2018-03-05 Last updated: 2018-03-05

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
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Output format
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  • asciidoc
  • rtf