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Host preference and network properties in biotrophic plant-fungal associations
Univ Tartu, Nat Hist Museum, 14a Ravila, EE-50411 Tartu, Estonia.;Univ Tartu, Dept Bot, 40 Lai St, EE-51005 Tartu, Estonia..
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology. Univ Tartu, Dept Bot, 40 Lai St, EE-51005 Tartu, Estonia.
Katholieke Univ Leuven, Dept Biol Plant Conservat & Populat Biol, Kasteelpk Arenberg 31, B-3001 Heverlee, Belgium..
Univ Minnesota, Dept Plant Biol, 1445 Gortner Ave, St Paul, MN 55108 USA..
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2018 (English)In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 217, no 3, p. 1230-1239Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Analytical methods can offer insights into the structure of biological networks, but mechanisms that determine the structure of these networks remain unclear. We conducted a synthesis based on 111 previously published datasets to assess a range of ecological and evolutionary mechanisms that may influence the plant-associated fungal interaction networks. We calculated the relative host effect on fungal community composition and compared nestedness and modularity among different mycorrhizal types and endophytic fungal guilds. We also assessed how plant-fungal network structure was related to host phylogeny, environmental and sampling properties. Orchid mycorrhizal fungal communities responded most strongly to host identity, but the effect of host was similar among all other fungal guilds. Community nestedness, which did not differ among fungal guilds, declined significantly with increasing mean annual precipitation on a global scale. Orchid and ericoid mycorrhizal fungal communities were more modular than ectomycorrhizal and root endophytic communities, with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in an intermediate position. Network properties among a broad suite of plant-associated fungi were largely comparable and generally unrelated to phylogenetic distance among hosts. Instead, network metrics were predominantly affected by sampling and matrix properties, indicating the importance of study design in properly inferring ecological patterns.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY , 2018. Vol. 217, no 3, p. 1230-1239
Keywords [en]
endophytes, host specificity, macroecology, modularity, mycorrhizal fungi, nestedness, network analysis, phylogenetic distance
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-343789DOI: 10.1111/nph.14895ISI: 000424541600027PubMedID: 29165806OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-343789DiVA, id: diva2:1187901
Available from: 2018-03-06 Created: 2018-03-06 Last updated: 2018-03-06Bibliographically approved

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Bahram, Mohammad

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