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Illiberal Geographies: Popular geopolitics and Russian biopolitical regionalism
University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
2018 (English)In: Eurasian geography and economics, ISSN 1538-7216, E-ISSN 1938-2863, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 51-72Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this article, we focus on how a variety of illiberal discourses construct a scene for new geopolitical and geocultural imageries of the post-Soviet space, Europe, and Eurasia. Academically, our approach falls into disciplinary niches known as popular geopolitics (when it comes to territories) and biopolitics (when it comes to people). More specifically, we try to see how Russian artistic personalities and public intellectuals contribute to the re-imagination of the post-Soviet space along the lines of Russian illiberal - and largely anti-Western - thinking. Among our protagonists are Valery Gergiev, Iosif Kobzon, Yulia Chicherina, Gleb Kornilov, Ivan Okhlobystin, and Zakhar Prilepin. All of them are important cultural figures who produce cultural justifications for imperial foreign policy in general, and Russia's annexation of Crimea and de facto occupation of Donbas in particular. Our main argument is that the illiberal imagery of the post-Soviet world drastically reduces the validity of the major pillars of international society, such as state territorial borders, national jurisdictions, citizenship, and legal obligations and commitments. Instead of the rule of law Russian performative illiberalism puts a premium on a series of loosely defined yet foundational for this type of imagery concepts such as patriotism, national spirit and pride, and "natural," "organic" bonds defining the sense of belonging to Russia as a trans-border political community.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 59, no 1, p. 51-72
National Category
Human Geography Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-346009DOI: 10.1080/15387216.2018.1434804ISI: 000451526000004OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-346009DiVA, id: diva2:1190149
Available from: 2018-03-13 Created: 2018-03-13 Last updated: 2019-01-24Bibliographically approved

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Yatsyk, Alexandra

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