uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Hypertension Associated With Silica Dust Intoxication Aggravates Brain Pathology Following Traumatic Brain Injury: New Roles of Neurotrophic Factors
Univ Med & Pharm, Cluj-Napoca, Romania.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
Univ Basque Country, Bilbao, Spain.
Harvard Univ, Boston, USA.
Show others and affiliations
2017 (English)In: The journal of head trauma rehabilitation, ISSN 0885-9701, E-ISSN 1550-509X, Vol. 32, no 6, p. E68-E69Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction/Rational: Military personnel engaged in combat operation are often exposed to desert storm resulting in silica dust (SiO2 nanoparticles) intoxication. In addition, combat stress, sleep deprivation and continuous attention for enemy group results in mild to moderate hypertension. Under such situations, any traumatic brain or spinal cord injury could result in massive brain pathology due to stress induced hypertension and possibly SiO2 nanoparticles intoxication. However, effects of trauma in hypertension and SiO2 intoxication are still not well known. In present study we investigated the effects of hypertension and SiO2 intoxication of the pathophysiology of traumatic brain injury (TBI).

Method/Approach: Male Wistar rats (250-300 g) were made renal hypertensive by 2kidney 1clip (2K1C) procedure allowing mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) reaching 180 ± 8 torr over 6 weeks. These hypertensive rats were exposed to SiO2NPs (40-50 nm) once daily (50 mg/kg, i.p.) for 8 days. On the 9th day these hypertensive and SiO2NPs intoxicated animals were subjected to TBI under anesthesia by making an incision (3 mm long and 2.5 mm deep) on the right parietal cerebral cortex after opening the skull (4mmOD) on both sides. The animas were allowed to survive 48 h after TBI.

Results/Effects: TBI in hypertensive and SiO2 nanoparticles intoxicated rats showed 4-to-6 fold higher breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to Evans blue albumin (EBA) and [131]-Iodine, edema formation and neuronal injuries as compared to TBI in normal animals at 48 h. Treatment with a multimodal drug Cerebrolysin-containing balanced composition of neurotrophic factors and active peptide fragments (10 ml/kg, i.v.) started 4 h after TBI followed by 4 injections at every 8 h markedly reduced brain pathologies. Whereas only 5 ml/kg of the drug is needed to achieve identical neuroprotection in normal rats after TBI.

Conclusions/Limitations: These observations are the first to show that a combination of hypertension and SiO2 nanoparticles worsens brain pathology in TBI. Under these situations almost double dose of drugs is needed to induce neuroprotection, not reported earlier. Our laboratory is engaged to see whether nanodelivery of cerebrolysin could have an added therapeutic value in this complicated situation of brain injury, a subject that is currently being investigated in our laboratory.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 32, no 6, p. E68-E69
National Category
Neurosciences Neurology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-347726DOI: 10.1097/HTR.0000000000000241ISI: 000418588100017OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-347726DiVA, id: diva2:1197046
Conference
North American Brain Injury Society's 13th Annual Conference on Brain Injury, April 6-9, 2016, Tampa, Florida, USA.
Note

Meeting Abstract: 0010

Available from: 2018-04-11 Created: 2018-04-11 Last updated: 2018-04-11Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textAbstracts

Authority records BETA

Sharma, Hari ShankerSharma, Aruna

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Sharma, Hari ShankerSharma, Aruna
By organisation
Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care
In the same journal
The journal of head trauma rehabilitation
NeurosciencesNeurology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 15 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf