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Trends in Diagnosis-Specific Work Disability Before and After Stroke: A Longitudinal Population-Based Study in Sweden.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5313-9052
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2018 (English)In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 7, no 1, article id e006991Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Although a stroke event often leads to work disability, diagnoses behind work disability before and after stroke are largely unknown. We examined the pre-event and postevent trends in diagnosis-specific work disability among patients of working age.

METHODS AND RESULTS: We included all new nonfatal stroke events in 2006-2008 from population-based hospital registers in Sweden among women and men aged 25 to 60 years (n=12 972). Annual days of diagnosis-specific work disability were followed for 4 years before and after stroke. Repeated measures negative binomial regression models using the generalized estimating equations method were fitted to examine trends in diagnosis-specific work disability before and after the event. Already during the 4 pre-event years, work disability attributed to circulatory diseases increased among women (rate ratio, 1.99; 95% confidence interval, 1.68-2.36) and men (rate ratio, 2.20; 95% confidence interval, 1.88-2.57). Increasing trends before stroke were also found for work disability attributed to mental disorders, musculoskeletal diseases, neoplasms, diseases of the nervous, respiratory, and digestive systems, injuries, and diabetes mellitus. As expected, a sharp increase in work disability days attributed to circulatory diseases was found during the first year after the event among both sexes. Overall, during 4 years after the stroke, there was a decreasing trend for circulatory diseases and injuries, whereas the trend was increasing for nervous diseases and diabetes mellitus.

CONCLUSIONS: Work disability attributed to several mental and somatic diagnoses is higher already before a stroke event.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 7, no 1, article id e006991
Keywords [en]
chronic disease, cohort study, population studies, registry, sick leave, stroke, work disability
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-348521DOI: 10.1161/JAHA.117.006991PubMedID: 29301760OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-348521DiVA, id: diva2:1197856
Available from: 2018-04-15 Created: 2018-04-15 Last updated: 2018-05-03Bibliographically approved

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