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Measuring isolation across space and over time with new tools:: Evidence from Californian metropolitan regions
University of California, Los Angeles.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography. Uppsala Universitet. (CALISTA)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4536-9229
2018 (English)In: Environment and Planning, B: Planning and Design, ISSN 0265-8135, E-ISSN 1472-3417, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 1038-1054Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Studies of segregation continue to explore analytic tools to engage with patterns of separation within cities. In recent work, scale has emerged as an important dimension of understanding segregation - simply put, separation is strongly affected by the scale which is used in the measurement process. Levels of segregation are also influenced by the time in which the analysis takes place. We outline an approach to separation which has four dimensions - (1) using bespoke neighborhoods - who do you meet at varying scales, (2) measuring the size of the change in separation over time, (3) estimating the rate of change in separation across space and time and (4) visualizing the change, mapping changing levels of contact. The themes are explored using data from the diverse, multi ethnic neighborhoods in Californian metropolitan areas. The result of a bespoke neighborhood approach to segregation provides a more complete demonstration of the pattern of ethnic segregation. We know that there are declining overall levels of segregation, but while levels are decreasing for Whites they are increasing for Hispanics and Asians but at different rates depending on local contexts. Viewing assimilation in a multi-scalar visual context expands our understanding of segregation and assimilation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 46, no 6, p. 1038-1054
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-348704DOI: 10.1177/2399808318756642ISI: 000450331600004OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-348704DiVA, id: diva2:1198271
Available from: 2018-04-17 Created: 2018-04-17 Last updated: 2019-01-22Bibliographically approved

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Östh, John

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