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Powerlessness, Normalization, and Resistance: A Foucauldian Discourse Analysis of Women's Narratives On Obstetric Fistula in Eastern Sudan
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1314-2943
2017 (English)In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 27, no 12, p. 1828-1841Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Eastern Sudan has high prevalence of female circumcision and child marriage constituting a risk for developing obstetric fistula. Few studies have examined gender roles' relation with obstetric fistula in Sudan. To explore the associated power-relations that may put women at increased risk for developing obstetric fistula, we conducted nine interviews with women living with obstetric fistula in Kassala in eastern Sudan. Using a Foucauldian discourse analysis, we identified three discourses: powerlessness, normalization, and covert resistance. Existing power-relations between the women and other societal members revealed their internalization of social norms as absolute truth, and influenced their status and decision-making power in regard to circumcision, early marriage, and other transformative decisions as well as women's general behaviors. The women showed subtle resistance to these norms and the harassment they encountered because of their fistula. These findings suggest that a more in-depth contextual assessment could benefit future maternal health interventions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 27, no 12, p. 1828-1841
Keyword [en]
resilience, resistance, women's health, gender, reproductive health, feminism, power/relations, qualitative discourse analysis, East Africa
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-348939DOI: 10.1177/1049732317720423ISI: 000426471800007PubMedID: 28766375OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-348939DiVA, id: diva2:1198932
Available from: 2018-04-19 Created: 2018-04-19 Last updated: 2018-04-19Bibliographically approved

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Hamed, SarahAhlberg, Beth MainaTrenholm, Jill E.

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Department of Women's and Children's HealthInternational Maternal and Reproductive Health and MigrationDepartment of Sociology
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Qualitative Health Research
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