uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Expression of otic developmental markers in the adult human vestibular system
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
2016 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

The sense of hearing and balance depend on the highly organized arrangement of sensory hair cells and non-sensory supporting cells in the cochlea and in the balance organs of the vestibular system. Hair cell-dependent hearing loss is permanent due to the inability of the hair cells to regenerate. Recent research has determined that differentiation of supporting cells into hair cells could be induced by forcing expression of certain otic developmental genes. The cochlea would be the ideal model to study, however, because of the limited accessibility, the balance organs have become the second choice because of the similarities to the cochlea. This project offered a unique opportunity of access to surgical waste consisting of tissue from the vestibular system.The purpose was to stain the tissue for different developmental markers in order to find cells that might have the capacity of differentiating into new hair cells. The tissue was therefore stained for different markers associated with otic development and the expression was visualized by immunofluorescence.We found expression of the developmental marker Pax-2 in the balance organs, as well as in the endolymphatic sac. Expression of the proliferation marker Ki-67 was found in the endolymphatic sac but not in the balance organs, suggesting that the different organs have extensively diverse functions, although equally important in maintaining the inner ear homeostasis.These results offer a basis for further research in the pursuit of developing a potential gene therapy-based treatment to cure hair cell-dependent hearing loss.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016.
Keywords [en]
Hearing loss • Sensory hair cells • Utricle • Ampulla • Transcription factor
National Category
Biomedical Laboratory Science/Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-349014OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-349014DiVA, id: diva2:1199233
Educational program
Biomedical Laboratory Science Programme; Biomedical Laboratory Science Programme
Examiners
Available from: 2018-04-20 Created: 2018-04-19 Last updated: 2018-04-20Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

By organisation
Department of Women's and Children's Health
Biomedical Laboratory Science/Technology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 8 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf