uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
An open trial of individualized face-to-face cognitive behavior therapy for psychological distress in parents of children after end of treatment for childhood cancer including a cognitive behavioral conceptualization
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Psychology in Healthcare.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Psychology in Healthcare.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7237-4429
Division of Psychology, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Neuropediatrics/Paediatric oncology.
Show others and affiliations
2018 (English)In: PeerJ, ISSN 2167-8359, E-ISSN 2167-8359, Vol. 6, article id e4570Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective

A subgroup of parents of children who have been treated for childhood cancer report high levels of psychological distress. To date there is no empirically supported psychological treatment targeting cancer-related psychological distress in this population. The aim of the current study was to test the feasibility and preliminarily evaluate the effect of individualized face-to-face cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for parents of children after the end of treatment for childhood cancer. A secondary aim was to present a cognitive behavioral conceptualization of cancer-related distress for these parents.

Methods

An open trial was conducted where 15 parents of children who had completed successful treatment for cancer three months to five years earlier and who reported psychological distress related to a child’s previous cancer disease were provided CBT at a maximum of 15 sessions. Participants were assessed at baseline, post-intervention, and three-month follow-up using self-reported psychological distress (including posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS), depression, and anxiety) and the diagnostic Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Feasibility outcomes relating to recruitment, data collection, and delivery of the treatment were also examined. Individual case formulations for each participant guided the intervention and these were aggregated and presented in a conceptualization detailing core symptoms and their suggested maintenance mechanisms.

Results

A total of 93% of the participants completed the treatment and all of them completed the follow-up assessment. From baseline to post-assessment, parents reported significant improvements in PTSS, depression, and anxiety with medium to large effect sizes (Cohen’s d = 0.65–0.92). Results were maintained or improved at a three-month follow-up. At baseline, seven (47%) participants fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for major depressive disorder and four (29%) fulfilled the criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder, compared to none at a post-assessment and a follow-up assessment. The resulting cognitive behavioral conceptualization suggests traumatic stress and depression as the core features of distress, and avoidance and inactivity is suggested as the core maintenance mechanisms.

Conclusion

The treatment was feasible and acceptable to the participants. Significant improvements in distress were observed during the study. Overall, results suggest that the psychological treatment for parents of children after end of treatment for childhood cancer used in the current study is promising and should be tested and evaluated in future studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 6, article id e4570
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-349407DOI: 10.7717/peerj.4570ISI: 000429852600001PubMedID: 29666751OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-349407DiVA, id: diva2:1201771
Funder
Swedish Research Council, VR521-2010-3042; VR521-2014-3337Swedish Cancer Society, CAN2013/580;CAN2014/613Available from: 2018-04-26 Created: 2018-04-26 Last updated: 2018-06-19Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(2572 kB)18 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 2572 kBChecksum SHA-512
582f8213d6bbbc32c73d83f6433f7b4de7e51fd79ebe37530f8511dba30b6f6944b92ad4dd0e59bfb1e50c0c35a03e6406a32b82e538633d90c9da7b6afa7510
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Authority records BETA

Ljungman, LisaCernvall, MartinGhaderi, AtaLjungman, Gustafvon Essen, Louise

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Ljungman, LisaCernvall, MartinGhaderi, AtaLjungman, Gustafvon Essen, Louise
By organisation
Clinical Psychology in HealthcareNeuropediatrics/Paediatric oncology
In the same journal
PeerJ
Cancer and OncologyPsychology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 18 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 69 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf