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Sex Differences and Predictors of Changes in Body Weight and Noncommunicable Diseases in a Random, Newly-Arrived Group of Refugees Followed for Two Years
Wayne State Univ, Dept Nutr & Food Sci, Detroit, MI 48202 USA..
Wayne State Univ, Dept Family Med & Publ Hlth Sci, Detroit, MI 48202 USA.;Michigan State Univ, Dept Family Med, Coll Human Med, 220 Trowbridge Rd, E Lansing, MI 48824 USA..
Wayne State Univ, Dept Nutr & Food Sci, Detroit, MI 48202 USA..
Michigan State Univ, Dept Family Med, Coll Human Med, 220 Trowbridge Rd, E Lansing, MI 48824 USA..
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, ISSN 1557-1912, E-ISSN 1557-1920, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 283-294Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We have reported that none of the psychological/mental variables examined predicted the increase in BMI and non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in Iraqi refugees after 1 year resettlement in Michigan. We continuously followed the same cohort of refugees for 2 years (Y2 FU) to further determine the gender difference in predicting of increased BMI and NCDs. Only 20% of the BMI variability could be accounted for by the factors examined. Number of dependent children and depression were positively and stress negatively associated with BMI in male refugees but not in females. Number of dependent children was negatively associated with changes in BMI and in males only. Two-third of the NCD variability was accounted for by gender, BMI, employment status, depression, posttraumatic stress disorders and coping skills. Unmarried, unemployed and with high PTSD scores at Y2 in males were positively and number of dependent children was negatively associated with NCD changes in females. Factors such as dietary patterns and lifestyle may have contributed to the increased BMI and NCDs in these refugees at 2 years post-settlement.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER , 2018. Vol. 20, no 2, p. 283-294
Keyword [en]
Iraqi refugees, Body mass index, Non-communicable disease, Post-displacementstressors, Financial, Sex differences
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-350744DOI: 10.1007/s10903-017-0565-9ISI: 000426934800005PubMedID: 28343246OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-350744DiVA, id: diva2:1206109
Available from: 2018-05-16 Created: 2018-05-16 Last updated: 2018-05-16Bibliographically approved

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Arnetz, Bengt

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