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Cephalic muscle development in the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri
Howard Univ, Coll Med, Dept Anat, Washington, DC 20059 USA..
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology. Uppsala Univ, Dept Organismal Biol, Evolutionary Biol Ctr, Norbyvagen 18A, S-75236 Uppsala, Sweden.;Flinders Univ S Australia, Sch Biol Sci, Coll Sci & Engn, Adelaide, SA 5042, Australia..ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0380-7347
Charles Univ Prague, Lab Study Craniofacial Evolut & Dev, Vinicna 7, Prague 12844, Czech Republic..
Friedrich Schiller Univ Jena, Inst Zool & Evolut Forsch, Jena, Germany..
2018 (English)In: Journal of morphology (1931. Print), ISSN 0362-2525, E-ISSN 1097-4687, Vol. 279, no 4, p. 494-516Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lungfishes are the extant sister group of tetrapods. As such, they are important for the study of evolutionary processes involved in the water to land transition of vertebrates. The evolution of a true neck, that is, the complete separation of the pectoral girdle from the cranium, is one of the most intriguing morphological transitions known among vertebrates. Other salient changes involve new adaptations for terrestrial feeding, which involves both the cranium and its associated musculature. Historically, the cranium has been extensively investigated, but the development of the cranial muscles much less so. Here, we present a detailed study of cephalic muscle development in the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri, which is considered to be the sister taxon to all other extant lungfishes. Neoceratodus shows several developmental patterns previously described in other taxa; the tendency of muscles to develop from anterior to posterior, from their region of origin toward insertion, and from lateral to ventral/medial (outside-in), at least in the branchial arches. The m.protractor pectoralis appears to develop as an extension of the most posterior m.levatores arcuum branchialium, supporting the hypothesis that the m.cucullaris and its derivatives (protractor pectoralis, levatores arcuum branchialium) are branchial muscles. We present a new hypothesis regarding the homology of the ventral branchial arch muscles (subarcualis recti and obliqui, transversi ventrales) in lungfishes and amphibians. Moreover, the morphology and development of the cephalic muscles confirms that extant lungfishes are neotenic and have been strongly influenced via paedomorphosis during their evolutionary history.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY , 2018. Vol. 279, no 4, p. 494-516
Keywords [en]
cranial muscles, Dipnoi, heterochrony, neoteny, ontogeny, paedomorphosis
National Category
Zoology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-350735DOI: 10.1002/jmor.20784ISI: 000427125200005PubMedID: 29214665OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-350735DiVA, id: diva2:1206133
Available from: 2018-05-16 Created: 2018-05-16 Last updated: 2018-05-16Bibliographically approved

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