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Presence of Aedes and Anopheles mosquito larvae is correlated to bacteria found in domestic water-storage containers
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Microbiology. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6314-3357
International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, New Delhi, India.
International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, New Delhi, India.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4265-1835
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2018 (English)In: FEMS Microbiology Ecology, ISSN 0168-6496, E-ISSN 1574-6941, Vol. 94, no 6, article id fiy058Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Water-storage containers are common in households where access to water is scarce and often act as breeding sites for vector mosquitoes. Bacteria in these containers may be important for attracting or repelling ovipositing mosquitoes. We hypothesized that bacterial community composition in water-storage containers would represent either inhibitory or suitable environmental conditions for mosquito larvae. To investigate this, we characterized the bacterial community composition in water-storage containers and correlated these communities to Aedes and Anopheles larval densities. Water samples were collected over two years from 13 containers in an Indian village and analyzed by high throughput 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. Comparisons of bacterial community composition between water with and without mosquito larvae showed that Xanthomonadaceae, Comamonadaceae and Burkholderiaceae were more common (P < 0.05) in absence of larvae, while Lachnospiraceae, Synechococcaceae, Alcaligenaceae and Cryomorphaceae were more common (P < 0.05) in presence of larvae. Indicator analysis identified operational taxonomic units designated as CL500–29 marine group (Acidimicrobiaceae) and FukuN101 (Microbacteriaceae) for absence and presence of larvae, respectively. These results contribute to the understanding of which bacteria, directly or indirectly, can be linked to absence or presence of mosquitoes around households and set the basis for potential measures to be taken against these vector mosquitoes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 94, no 6, article id fiy058
Keywords [en]
16S rRNA, Aedes, Anopheles, bacteria, domestic water storage, vector-borne diseases
National Category
Microbiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-351129DOI: 10.1093/femsec/fiy058ISI: 000439783400003OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-351129DiVA, id: diva2:1208754
Funder
Swedish Research Council, SWE-2012-153Available from: 2018-05-19 Created: 2018-05-19 Last updated: 2018-10-12Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Exploration of bacteria associated with Anopheles mosquitoes around the world: For the prevention of transmission of malaria
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploration of bacteria associated with Anopheles mosquitoes around the world: For the prevention of transmission of malaria
2018 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Every year, hundreds of thousands of people die from malaria. Malaria is a disease caused by parasites, which are spread by female vector mosquitoes of the genus Anopheles. Current control measures against malaria are based on drugs against the parasites and vector control using insecticides. A problem with these measures is the development of resistance, both in the parasites against the drugs and the mosquitoes against the insecticides. Therefore, additional areas of malaria control must be explored. One such area involves the bacteria associated with the vector mosquitoes. Bacteria have been shown to affect mosquitoes at all life stages, e.g. by affecting choice of oviposition site by female mosquitoes, development of larvae and susceptibility to parasite infection in adults. Furthermore, genetic modification of symbiotic bacteria has been suggested as a mean of killing the parasites in the mosquitoes. This thesis is based on four field studies and one laboratory study and aims to investigate the naturally occurring bacteria associated with different life stages of malaria mosquitoes and how they are acquired. All studies are based on amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. We found that overall mosquitoes contain different bacterial communities. However, bacteria associated with adults reflect their life history and can predict the origin of mosquitoes. Bacteria in larvae are similar during the developmental stages but vary with breeding site. Also in larvae, the bacteria could be used to predict the origin of breeding site. Some bacteria could be related to the presence or absence of Anopheles around human habitations and the diversity of aquatic bacteria in breeding sites is large, though some taxa are common. Overall, both environmental and host-genetic factors affect the gut bacterial composition in adult females. In conclusion, this thesis contributes to increasing the knowledge of bacterial diversity associated with Anopheles mosquitoes and to provide insight into how the bacteria are acquired, which can be useful in malaria control. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2018. p. 54
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Science and Technology, ISSN 1651-6214 ; 1691
Keywords
microbiota, microbiome, vector-borne disease, 16S rRNA gene, amplicon sequencing
National Category
Microbiology
Research subject
Biology with specialization in Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-352547 (URN)978-91-513-0381-9 (ISBN)
Public defence
2018-09-14, A1:111a, BMC, Husargatan 3, Uppsala, 09:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2018-08-22 Created: 2018-06-29 Last updated: 2018-09-07

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Nilsson, Louise K. J.Bertilsson, Stefan

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