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The influence of and change in procedural justice on self-rated health trajectories: Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health results.
Stockholm University.
Norwich Business School, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK.
Stockholm University.
Stockholm University.
2016 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990X, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 320-8, article id 3565Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: Procedural justice perceptions are shown to be associated with minor psychiatric disorders, long sickness absence spells, and poor self-rated health, but previous studies have rarely considered how changes in procedural justice influence changes in health.

METHODS: Data from four consecutive biennial waves of the Swedish Longitudinal Survey of Health (SLOSH) (N=5854) were used to examine trajectories of self-rated health. Adjusting for age, sex, socioeconomic position, and marital status, we studied the predictive power of change in procedural justice perceptions using individual growth curve models within a multilevel framework.

RESULTS: The results show that self-rated health trajectories slowly decline over time. The rate of change was influenced by age and sex, with older people and women showing a slower rate. After adjusting for age, sex, socioeconomic position, and marital status, procedural justice was significantly associated with self-rated health. Also, improvements in procedural justice were associated with improvements in self-rated health. Additionally, a reverse relationship with and change in self-rated health predicting procedural justice was found.

CONCLUSIONS: Our findings support the idea that procedural justice at work is a crucial aspect of the psychosocial work environment and that changes towards more procedural justice could influence self-rated health positively. The reciprocal association of procedural justice and self-rated health warrants further research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 42, no 4, p. 320-8, article id 3565
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-351143DOI: 10.5271/sjweh.3565PubMedID: 27128433OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-351143DiVA, id: diva2:1208776
Available from: 2018-05-19 Created: 2018-05-19 Last updated: 2018-05-28

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Eib, Constanze

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