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Body size and risk of atrial fibrillation: a cohort study of 1.1 million young men
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6534-2613
Lund Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, Lund, Sweden.
Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.
Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Stockholm, Sweden;Stockholm Cty Council, Ctr Epidemiol & Community Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 283, no 4, p. 346-355Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Whilst tall stature has been related to lower risk of vascular disease, it has been proposed as a risk factor for atrial fibrillation. Little is known about other anthropometric measures and their joint effects on risk of atrial fibrillation.

Objectives: We aim to investigate associations and potential joint effects of height, weight, body surface area (BSA) and body mass index (BMI) with risk of atrial fibrillation.

Methods: In a cohort covering 1 153 151 18-year-old men participating in the Swedish military conscription (1972-1995), Cox regression was used to investigate associations of height, weight, BSA and BMI with risk of atrial fibrillation.

Results: During a median of 26.3 years of follow-up, higher height was associated with higher risk of atrial fibrillation (hazard ratio [HR] 2.80; 95% CI 2.63-2.98; for 5th vs. 1st quintile) and so was larger BSA (HR 3.05; 95% CI 2.82-3.28; for 5th vs. 1st quintile). Higher weight and BMI were to a lesser extent associated with risk of atrial fibrillation (BMI: 1.42; 95% CI 1.33-1.52, for 5th vs. 1st quintile). We found a multiplicative joint effect of height and weight. Adjusting for muscle strength, exercise capacity and diseases related to atrial fibrillation attenuated these measures.

Conclusions: Higher height and weight are strongly associated with higher risk of atrial fibrillation. These associations are multiplicative and independent of each other and are summarized in a strong association of body surface area with risk of atrial fibrillation. The mechanisms remain unknown but may involve increased atrial volume load with larger body size.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY , 2018. Vol. 283, no 4, p. 346-355
Keywords [en]
atrial fibrillation, body mass Index, body surface area, height, weight
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-353116DOI: 10.1111/joim.12717ISI: 000428438600002PubMedID: 29178512OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-353116DiVA, id: diva2:1216034
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2007-5942]Swedish Research Council, 2010-1078]Available from: 2018-06-11 Created: 2018-06-11 Last updated: 2018-06-11Bibliographically approved

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Andersen, KasperSundström, Johan

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