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Socioeconomic status and diagnosis, treatment, and mortality in men with prostate cancer. Nationwide population-based study
Umeå Univ, Dept Surg & Perioperat Sci, Urol & Androl, Umeå, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6958-5930
URI, Unit Urol, Div Expt Oncol, Milan, Italy; IRCCS, Osped San Raffaele, Milan, Italy.
Ryhov Hosp, Dept Urol, Jönköpinh, Sweden.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery. Umeå Univ, Dept Biobank Res, Umeå, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6808-4405
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2018 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 142, no 12, p. 2478-2484Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Patients with high socioeconomic status (SES) have better cancer outcomes than patients with low SES. This has also been shown in Sweden, a country with tax‐financed health care aiming to provide care on equal terms to all residents. The association between income and educational level and diagnostics and treatment as outlined in national guidelines and prostate cancer (Pca) and all‐cause mortality was assessed in 74,643 men by use of data in the National Prostate Cancer Register of Sweden and a number of other health care registers and demographic databases. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, men with high income had higher probability of Pca detected in a health‐check‐up, top versus bottom income quartile, odds ratio (OR) 1.60 (95% CI 1.45–1.77) and lower probability of waiting more than 3 months for prostatectomy, OR 0.77 (0.69–0.86). Men with the highest incomes also had higher probability of curative treatment for intermediate and high‐risk cancer, OR 1.77 (1.61–1.95) and lower risk of positive margins, (incomplete resection) at prostatectomy, OR 0.80 (0.71–0.90). Similar, but weaker associations were observed for educational level. At 6 years of follow‐up, Pca mortality was modestly lower for men with high income, which was statistically significant for localized high‐risk and metastatic Pca in men with no comorbidities. All‐cause mortality was less than half in top versus bottom quartile of income (12% vs. 30%, p < 0.001) among men above age 65. Our findings underscore the importance of adherence to guidelines to ensure optimal and equal care for all patients diagnosed with cancer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY , 2018. Vol. 142, no 12, p. 2478-2484
Keywords [en]
prostate cancer, clinical cancer register, socioeconomic status
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-353354DOI: 10.1002/ijc.31272ISI: 000430390800007PubMedID: 29363113OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-353354DiVA, id: diva2:1217032
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2012-5047Swedish Cancer Society, 2016-0700Available from: 2018-06-12 Created: 2018-06-12 Last updated: 2018-06-12Bibliographically approved

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Häggström, ChristelLambe, MatsStattin, Pär

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