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Using the Do No Harm approach to analyze effectiveness of the ‘Women and Girls Oasis project’ in Za’atari refugee camp, Jordan.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology.
2018 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Humanitarian assistance, driven by its principle of assisting humanity and alleviating suffering, may often be counterproductive to its actual purpose. Poor response planning by humanitarians can unintentionally contribute to heightening of risks and hazards faced by populations being assisted. This can reduce the effectiveness of the projects that are actually designed to meet the needs of those most affected by a humanitarian emergency. The Do No Harm (DNH) approach developed by Mary Anderson is a good tool to analyze the harmful effects that a project may produce in any given context through its interactions with the connectors and dividers in that context. This thesis uses the DNH approach to analyze effectiveness of the ‘Women and Girls Oasis project’ implemented by UN Women (and its partner agencies) in the Za’atari refugee camp, Jordan. Through an analytical approach, the thesis identifies the key connectors and dividers relating to Syrian refugee women in the Za’atari camp and analyses the impact that the project has had on these connectors and dividers. The thesis concludes that this project cannot be assessed as being completely effective, due to the potential harm that the project can produce by strengthening the key dividers relating to ‘systems and institutions’ and ‘attitudes and actions’, and weakening the connector relating to ‘values and interests’ for Syrian refugee women in Za’atari. These can produce harmful effects such as the increase in the drop out of refugee women from the project, enhance the hostile attitudes among Syrian refugee men against women’s participation in Cash for Work (CfW) activities and increase the dependency of women refugees on humanitarian aid. The harmful effects can limit the impacts that the project aims to achieve, and hence reduce effectiveness. The thesis also presents some options for addressing these effects to improve project effectiveness in the longer term.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. , p. 48
Keywords [en]
Do No Harm, effectiveness, women refugees, Za’atari camp, connectors, dividers, harmful effects
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-354048OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-354048DiVA, id: diva2:1220447
Subject / course
International Humanitarian Action
Educational program
Master Programme in Humanitarian Action and Conflict
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2018-06-21 Created: 2018-06-18 Last updated: 2018-06-21Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
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  • en-US
  • fi-FI
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Output format
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