uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Going Through a Phase
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics. (Physics Education Research)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3070-567X
Uppsala University, University Administration, Division for Quality Enhancement.
Karlstads universitet.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4997-2938
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Students have difficulties understanding energy transformations involved in phase changes in physics and chemistry education. For example, with a predict-observe-explain set-up, we have found that students tend to intuit that when table salt is poured onto ice, the ice will melt and the temperature increase. They are surprised to see that although the ice melts (due to freezing-point depression), the temperature actually decreases. In this study, we explore how infrared cameras as a visualization technology can help students come to terms with such challenges.

We have designed a teaching sequence for in-service science teachers on the topic of phase changes, with a focus on the central idea that it requires energy to break bonds between particles. In group discussions, students are encouraged to use this idea to explain how the temperature of water can be constant during phase change from solid to liquid, and from liquid to gas, and draw on their experiences that it feels cold when they walk out of the shower but hot when water is poured onto the stove in a sauna. With the help of an infrared camera, students can see how the temperature decreases as water evaporates from their body. With this technology, they can also see that the temperature of a piece of paper increases as moist air condenses on its surface, and that the temperature decreases when the water evaporates away in dry air. Through video analysis, we study students’ interactions with each other and the types of talk they engage in during the exercises. Early findings in a pilot study with secondary school students indicate that they tend to interpret condensation as release of energy due to particles colliding with a surface, rather than bond formation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018.
Keywords [en]
Physics Education Research, Thermodynamics, Infrared Cameras, Teaching Sequence, Teacher Training, Thermodynamics Education Research, Science Education
National Category
Other Physics Topics
Research subject
Physics with specialization in Physics Education
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-356314OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-356314DiVA, id: diva2:1234405
Conference
The Gordon Research Seminar on Physics Research and Education, Smithfield, June 9-10, 2018
Note

Presented both orally and as a poster.

Available from: 2018-07-24 Created: 2018-07-24 Last updated: 2018-11-01Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

https://www.grc.org/physics-research-and-education-grs-conference/2018/

Authority records BETA

Samuelsson, RobinElmgren, Maja

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Samuelsson, RobinElmgren, MajaHaglund, Jesper
By organisation
Physics DidacticsDivision for Quality Enhancement
Other Physics Topics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 91 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf