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The English pronunciation teaching in Europe survey: selected results
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2012 (English)In: Research in Language, ISSN 1731-7533, E-ISSN 2083-4616, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 5-27Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper provides an overview of the main findings from a European-wide on-line survey of English pronunciation teaching practices. Both quantitative and qualitative data from seven countries (Finland, France, Germany, Macedonia, Poland, Spain and Switzerland) are presented, focusing on teachers' comments about:● their own pronunciation,● their training,● their learners’ goals, skills, motivation and aspirations,● their preferences for certain varieties (and their perception of their students' preferences).The results of EPTiES reveal interesting phenomena across Europe, despite shortcomings in terms of construction and distribution. For example, most respondents are non-native speakers of English and the majority of them rate their own mastery of English pronunciation favourably. However, most feel they had little or no training in how to teach pronunciation, which begs the question of how teachers are coping with this key aspect of language teaching. In relation to target models, RP remains the variety of English which teachers claim to use, whilst recognizing that General American might be preferred by some students. Differences between countries are explored, especially via replies to open-ended questions, allowing a more nuanced picture to emerge for each country. Other survey research is also referred to, in order to contextualise the analyses and implications for teaching English and for training English teachers.;This paper provides an overview of the main findings from a European-wide on-line survey of English pronunciation teaching practices. Both quantitative and qualitative data from seven countries (Finland, France, Germany, Macedonia, Poland, Spain and Switzerland) are presented, focusing on teachers' comments about: their own pronunciation, their training, their learners' goals, skills, motivation and aspirations, their preferences for certain varieties (and their perception of their students' preferences). The results of EPTiES reveal interesting phenomena across Europe, despite shortcomings in terms of construction and distribution. For example, most respondents are non-native speakers of English and the majority of them rate their own mastery of English pronunciation favourably. However, most feel they had little or no training in how to teach pronunciation, which begs the question of how teachers are coping with this key aspect of language teaching. In relation to target models, RP remains the variety of English which teachers claim to use, whilst recognizing that General American might be preferred by some students. Differences between countries are explored, especially via replies to open-ended questions, allowing a more nuanced picture to emerge for each country. Other survey research is also referred to, in order to contextualise the analyses and implications for teaching English and for training English teachers. Adapted from the source document;This paper provides an overview of the main findings from a European-wide on-line survey of English pronunciation teaching practices. Both quantitative and qualitative data from seven countries (Finland, France, Germany, Macedonia, Poland, Spain and Switzerland) are presented, focusing on teachers' comments about: ● their own pronunciation, ● their training, ● their learners’ goals, skills, motivation and aspirations, ● their preferences for certain varieties (and their perception of their students' preferences). The results of EPTiES reveal interesting phenomena across Europe, despite shortcomings in terms of construction and distribution. For example, most respondents are non-native speakers of English and the majority of them rate their own mastery of English pronunciation favourably. However, most feel they had little or no training in how to teach pronunciation, which begs the question of how teachers are coping with this key aspect of language teaching. In relation to target models, RP remains the variety of English which teachers claim to use, whilst recognizing that General American might be preferred by some students. Differences between countries are explored, especially via replies to open-ended questions, allowing a more nuanced picture to emerge for each country. Other survey research is also referred to, in order to contextualise the analyses and implications for teaching English and for training English teachers;

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Versita , 2012. Vol. 10, no 1, p. 5-27
Keywords [en]
Surveys, Teacher Attitudes, Europe, English as a Second Language Teaching Methods, Second Language Teachers, English as a Second Language Instruction, Pronunciation Instruction, article, Teacher Education
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Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-354215DOI: 10.2478/v10015-011-0047-4OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-354215DiVA, id: diva2:1236545
Note

http://www.syndetics.com/index.aspx?isbn=/sc.gif&issn=1731-7533&client=uppsalaunivsweden;http://www.syndetics.com/index.aspx?isbn=/mc.gif&issn=1731-7533&client=uppsalaunivsweden;http://www.syndetics.com/index.aspx?isbn=/lc.gif&issn=1731-7533&client=uppsalaunivsweden;; Journal Article

Available from: 2018-08-02 Created: 2018-08-02 Last updated: 2018-08-02

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Publisher's full texthttp://uu.summon.serialssolutions.com/2.0.0/link/0/eLvHCXMwjV3di9QwEB_2fFLk8Puqd0ce1Aehkk3SJF2QY7kPRG59OhV8CWmbHAvSk027ev-9k2226MKBD33oB2kzk05-M5n5BYCz9zTfsQnTqpaOOpwMyoYLJfBMaNEIb5XFvsTi5MV3Pf-sPy30-QS2GxeiNFPOO_qeNz_W7gSvfMBj1lbtLLhZ6GfNcm3zOO3IPdhjNI7sM321tcYyQeCp4tMcoTn_d_75C1TGKpA-jIyhD2D_12bBunHXq_62GxdIRbSnF49gPyFGMh9U_Bgmrn0CLy5TnDGQt-RypEYOT4Gj4kkqziX44rZvk_hJlzInybIlQxSehH61drfP4MvF-dXpxzztjJDX2NEiL5zXihe2rFUhK994lCWXFj1LXnkZYZWwiB0kggvObK1ULUtvtfK0oh4xBn8OD23MoG-7TaVdcwCE1V5gi9Zq5gSNdJMUve66qS16iK5kGbzbCs78HJgwDHoQTCiNnnbEXgZthYn0k0ZkcLQVrbFVDNrUXTCxbDWS7xQqgzeDvMemmAnMUKNFyRiNnPLSdL-7DA52npOR4izynWfwetDUeCsyZZ8tv87NzerahN5sBkUGckePJv2l4e7PRztVvPy_9l_BfcRQbIjKHMK9btW7I5j0_TFa22-L481o_ANO-ugO

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