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Associations between adolescent risk for restrictive disordered eating and long-term outcomes related to somatic symptoms, body mass index, and poor well-being
Umea Univ, Epidemiol & Global Hlth, Umea, Sweden.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Public Health.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4095-7961
Flinders Univ S Australia, Sch Psychol, Adelaide, SA, Australia.
Flinders Univ S Australia, Sch Psychol, Adelaide, SA, Australia.
2018 (English)In: British Journal of Health Psychology, ISSN 1359-107X, E-ISSN 2044-8287, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 496-518Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

ObjectiveTo date, no longitudinal, community-based studies have examined the association between disordered eating emerging in adolescence and long-term physical well-being. This study sought to explore the longitudinal associations between risk for restrictive disordered eating (DE-R; those not presenting with binge-purge symptoms) in adolescence and trajectories of functional somatic symptoms (FSS) and body mass index (BMI), and several indicators of poor physical well-being across early- to mid-adulthood, including medication, number of doctor visits, and sick leave. DesignData were obtained from the Northern Swedish Cohort Study (N=1,001), a prospective longitudinal study including four time points from age 16 to 42years. MethodsA cumulative measure of DE-R risk was computed. Latent class growth analysis was used to identify subpopulation trajectories of FSS and BMI. The three-step method for auxiliary variables and logistic regressions were used to assess associations between DE-R and the trajectory classes as well as indicators of poorphysical well-being. ResultsThree trajectories were identified for FSS. A gender by BMI interaction led to a classification of four BMI trajectories in men, but three in women. The presence of DE-R risk in adolescence increased odds of unfavourable FSS development, increasing BMI in women, and continually low BMI in men. Indicators of poor physical well-being at ages 21, 30, and 42years were associated with DE-R risk in adolescence. ConclusionsData spanning nearly three decades suggest that physical well-being impairment is related to DE-R risk measured earlier in life, underscoring the urgency for targeted, gender-sensitive preventive interventions for teenagers. What is already known on this subject? Disordered eating is linked to poor physical and mental well-being and quality of life. No longitudinal studies have examined long-term physical well-being consequences of adolescent disordered eating risk. What does this study add? Non-purging disordered eating symptoms in adolescence predict adverse physical well-being outcomes in middle-aged men and women. Targeted interventions and preventative work during adolescence are needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY , 2018. Vol. 23, no 2, p. 496-518
Keywords [en]
disordered eating, longitudinal, adolescence, quality of life, body mass index, youth, cohort study, psychosomatic health
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-352581DOI: 10.1111/bjhp.12301ISI: 000428990500016PubMedID: 29457326OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-352581DiVA, id: diva2:1237096
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 259-2012-37Available from: 2018-08-07 Created: 2018-08-07 Last updated: 2020-01-27Bibliographically approved

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Hammarström, Anne

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