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Antibiotics, gut microbiome and obesity
Univ Auckland, Liggins Inst, Auckland, New Zealand..
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Univ Auckland, Liggins Inst, Auckland, New Zealand.;Univ Auckland, Better Start Natl Sci Challenge, Auckland, New Zealand..ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1226-1956
Univ Auckland, Liggins Inst, Auckland, New Zealand..
Univ Auckland, Liggins Inst, Auckland, New Zealand.;Univ Auckland, Better Start Natl Sci Challenge, Auckland, New Zealand..
2018 (English)In: Clinical Endocrinology, ISSN 0300-0664, E-ISSN 1365-2265, Vol. 88, no 2, p. 185-200Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Antibiotics have been hailed by many as "miracle drugs" that have been effectively treating infectious diseases for over a century, leading to a marked reduction in morbidity and mortality. However, with the increasing use of antibiotics, we are now faced not only with the increasing threat of antibiotic resistance, but also with a rising concern about potential long-term effects of antibiotics on human health, including the development of obesity. The obesity pandemic continues to increase, a problem that affects both adults and children alike. Disruptions to the gut microbiome have been linked to a multitude of adverse conditions, including obesity, type 2 diabetes, inflammatory bowel diseases, anxiety, autism, allergies, and autoimmune diseases. This review focuses on the association between antibiotics and obesity, and the role of the gut microbiome. There is strong evidence supporting the role of antibiotics in the development of obesity in well-controlled animal models. However, evidence for this link in humans is still inconclusive, and we need further well-designed clinical trials to clarify this association.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY , 2018. Vol. 88, no 2, p. 185-200
Keywords [en]
animal models, antibiotics, bacteria, childhood, gut microbiome, obesity
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-357189DOI: 10.1111/cen.13495ISI: 000429404400002PubMedID: 29023853OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-357189DiVA, id: diva2:1238441
Available from: 2018-08-13 Created: 2018-08-13 Last updated: 2018-08-13Bibliographically approved

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Derraik, Jose G. B.

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