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Geographic clines in wing morphology relate to colonization history in New World but not Old World populations of yellow dung flies
Univ Zurich, Dept Evolutionary Biol & Environm Studies, Winterthurerstr 190, CH-8057 Zurich, Switzerland.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology. Univ Zurich, Dept Evolutionary Biol & Environm Studies, Winterthurerstr 190, CH-8057 Zurich, Switzerland.
Univ Zurich, Dept Evolutionary Biol & Environm Studies, Winterthurerstr 190, CH-8057 Zurich, Switzerland.
Univ Zurich, Dept Evolutionary Biol & Environm Studies, Winterthurerstr 190, CH-8057 Zurich, Switzerland.
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2018 (English)In: Evolution, ISSN 0014-3820, E-ISSN 1558-5646, Vol. 72, no 8, p. 1629-1644Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Geographic dines offer insights about putative targets and agents of natural selection as well as tempo and mode of adaptation. However, demographic processes can lead to dines that are indistinguishable from adaptive divergence. Using the widespread yellow dung fly Scathophaga stercoraria (Diptera: Scathophagidae), we examine quantitative genetic differentiation (Q(ST)) of wing shape across North America, Europe, and Japan, and compare this differentiation with that of ten microsatellites (F-ST). Morphometric analyses of 28 populations reared at three temperatures revealed significant thermal plasticity, sexual dimorphism, and geographic differentiation in wing shape. In North America morphological differentiation followed the decline in microsatellite variability along the presumed route of recent colonization from the southeast to the northwest. Across Europe, where S. stercoraria presumably existed for much longer time and where no molecular pattern of isolation by distance was evident, clinal variation was less pronounced despite significant morphological differentiation (Q(ST) >F-ST). Shape vector comparisons further indicate that thermal plasticity (hot-to-cold) does not mirror patterns of latitudinal divergence (south-to-north), as might have been expected under a scenario with temperature as the major agent of selection. Our findings illustrate the importance of detailed phylogeographic information when interpreting geographic dines of dispersal traits in an adaptive evolutionary framework.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY , 2018. Vol. 72, no 8, p. 1629-1644
Keywords [en]
Allometry, biogeography, developmental canalization, dispersal, gene flow, insect flight
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-362836DOI: 10.1111/evo.13517ISI: 000441749600007PubMedID: 29911337OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-362836DiVA, id: diva2:1255518
Available from: 2018-10-12 Created: 2018-10-12 Last updated: 2018-10-12Bibliographically approved

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