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Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in siblings: an 8-year Swedish follow-up study.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
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2008 (English)In: Sleep, ISSN 0161-8105, E-ISSN 1550-9109, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 817-823Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background:

Understanding the genetic transmission of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) will help clinicians identify patients at risk and offer opportunities for intervention and treatment at specialist clinics.

Objective:

To estimate familial risk of hospitalization for OSAS in the adult population of Sweden, and to determine if there are any differences by age and sex.

Design, setting, and participants:

Using the MigMed database at the Karolinska Institute, we divided the population of Sweden into sibling groups based on a shared mother and father and ascertained the presence or absence of a primary hospital diagnosis of OSAS in each individual during the follow-up period, 1997 to 2004. Individuals were categorized as having or not having a sibling with OSAS, based on the presence or absence of the disorder in at least 1 of their siblings. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated for men and women with a sibling with OSAS, compared with men and women in the reference group (SIR = 1).

Results:

After accounting for socioeconomic status, age, geographic region, and period of diagnosis, men with at least 1 sibling who had OSAS had a SIR of 3.42 (95% CI, 2.18–5.36); the corresponding SIR in women was 3.25 (95% CI, 1.84–5.65).

Conclusions:

Our results indicate that physicians should consider family history of OSAS when deciding whether to refer a patient for further sleep examinations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 31, no 6, p. 817-823
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-364609DOI: 10.1093/sleep/31.6.817OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-364609DiVA, id: diva2:1259548
Available from: 2018-10-30 Created: 2018-10-30 Last updated: 2019-04-03Bibliographically approved

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Friberg, Danielle

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