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Influence of anti-inflammatory diet and smoking on mortality and survival in men and women: two prospective cohort studies.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 285, no 1, p. 75-91Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The associations between an anti-inflammatory diet and both all-cause and cause-specific mortality have been studied previously; however, the influence of an anti-inflammatory diet on survival time has not been investigated. Moreover, the potential modification of these associations by smoking status remains unclear.

OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to examine the associations between an anti-inflammatory diet index (AIDI) and all-cause and cause-specific mortality, to determine the association between the AIDI and differences in survival time and to assess effect modification by smoking status.

METHODS: The study population included 68 273 Swedish men and women (aged 45-83 years) at baseline. The anti-inflammatory potential of the diet was estimated using the validated AIDI, which includes 11 potential anti-inflammatory and five potential pro-inflammatory foods. Cox proportional hazards and Laplace regression were used to estimate hazard ratios and differences in survival time.

RESULTS: During 16 years of follow-up (1 057 959 person-years), 16 088 deaths [5980 due to cardiovascular disease (CVD) and 5252 due to cancer] were recorded. Participants in the highest versus lowest quartile of the AIDI had lower risks of all-cause (18% reduction, 95% CI: 14-22%), CVD (20%, 95% CI: 14-26%) and cancer (13%, 95% CI: 5-20%) mortality. The strongest inverse associations between the highest and lowest quartiles of AIDI and risk of mortality were observed in current smokers: 31%, 36% and 22% lower risks of all-cause, CVD and cancer mortality, respectively. The difference in survival time between current smokers in the lowest AIDI quartile and never smokers in the highest quartile was 4.6 years.

CONCLUSION: Adherence to a diet with high anti-inflammatory potential may reduce all-cause, CVD and cancer mortality and prolong survival time especially amongst smokers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 285, no 1, p. 75-91
Keywords [en]
anti-inflammatory index, diet, inflammation, mortality, prospective study, survival time
National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-367524DOI: 10.1111/joim.12823ISI: 000453771200006PubMedID: 30209831OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-367524DiVA, id: diva2:1267238
Available from: 2018-11-30 Created: 2018-11-30 Last updated: 2019-01-16Bibliographically approved

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Michaëlsson, KarlWolk, Alicja

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