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Longitudinal Continuity in Understanding and Production of Giving-Related Behavior From Infancy to Childhood
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
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2019 (English)In: Child Development, ISSN 0009-3920, E-ISSN 1467-8624, Vol. 90, no 2, p. e182-e191Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Infants have an early understanding of giving (the transfer of an item by one agent to another), but little is known about individual differences in these abilities or their developmental outcomes. Here, 9-month-olds (N = 59) showing clearer neural processing (Event-related potential, ERP) of a give-me gesture also evidenced a stronger reaction (pupil dilation) to an inappropriate response to a give-me gesture, and at 2 years were more likely to give in response to a give-me gesture. None of the differences in understanding and production of giving-related behaviors were associated with other sociocognitive variables investigated: language, gaze-following, and nongiving helping. The early developmental continuity in understanding and production of giving behavior is consistent with the great importance of giving for humans throughout the life span.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 90, no 2, p. e182-e191
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-370001DOI: 10.1111/cdev.13131ISI: 000460664900001PubMedID: 30102423OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-370001DiVA, id: diva2:1272061
Available from: 2018-12-18 Created: 2018-12-18 Last updated: 2019-04-11Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. The perception of actions and interactions: And the importance of context
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The perception of actions and interactions: And the importance of context
2019 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The perception of actions and interactions is a dynamic process linked with perceptual processes, the internal and external states of the individual, prior experiences, and the immediate environment. Given these differential contexts, it is very likely there are differences in how infants perceive, interpret, and respond to actions. The present thesis took a developmental and individual differences approach to understanding action perception and processing in infancy. The overarching aim was to understand the development of action perception and how individual differences contribute to the perception and processing of actions. More specifically, individual differences included the capacity to which variations in a child’s context can affect the development of action perception. Study I demonstrated that, like adults, infants could differentiate between physically possible and physically impossible apparent motion paths, as evidenced by pupil dilation. This perception may be related to the context of whether the motion was performed by a human figure or an object. Study II found that in the context of a more complex social interaction, infants differentiated between appropriate and inappropriate responses to a giving action. Furthermore, infants’ individual differences in perceiving a giving action were related to their own giving behaviors later in childhood, suggesting possible specialized mechanisms. Study III took an integrative perspective on context and demonstrated the joint impact of internal and external emotional contexts for infants’ subsequent selective attention during visual search. Infants’ visual attention was affected by previous exposure to a facial emotion and by the mothers’ negative affect. The results of these three studies demonstrate that given differential environmental contexts and experiences, there are differences in how individuals perceive and interpret actions and interactions. Together, this thesis proposes an integrative role of context in perception and demonstrates that perception can never be truly decontextualized.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2019. p. 102
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Social Sciences, ISSN 1652-9030 ; 164
Keywords
action understanding, action perception, motion, perception, context, environment, eye-tracking, pupil dilation
National Category
Psychology Social Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-379490 (URN)978-91-513-0597-4 (ISBN)
Public defence
2019-05-03, Sal IV, Universitetshuset, Biskopsgatan 3, Uppsala, 13:00 (English)
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Available from: 2019-04-11 Created: 2019-03-17 Last updated: 2019-05-07

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Juvrud, JoshuaBakker, MartaGredebäck, GustafKenward, Benjamin

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