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An Evolutionarily Conserved Abscisic Acid Signaling Pathway Regulates Dormancy in the Liverwort Marchantia polymorpha
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution. Monash Univ, Sch Biol Sci, Melbourne, Vic 3800, Australia.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0576-7636
Tokyo Univ Agr, Dept Biosci, Tokyo 1568502, Japan.
Monash Univ, Sch Biol Sci, Melbourne, Vic 3800, Australia.
Kobe Univ, Grad Sch Sci, Kobe, Hyogo 6578501, Japan.
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2018 (English)In: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 28, no 22, p. 3691-3699.e3Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dormancy is a key process allowing land plants to adapt to changing conditions in the terrestrial habitat, allowing the cessation of growth in response to environmental or physiological cues, entrance into a temporary quiescent state, and subsequent reactivation of growth in more favorable environmental conditions [1-3]. Dormancy may be induced seasonally, sporadically (e.g., in response to drought), or developmentally (e.g., seeds and apical dominance). Asexual propagules, known as gemmae, derived via clonal reproduction in bryophytes, are often dormant until displaced from the parent plant. In the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha, gemmae are produced within specialized receptacles, gemma cups, located on the dorsal side of the vegetative thallus [4]. Mature gemmae are detached from the parent plant but may remain in the cup, with gemma growth suppressed as long as the gemmae remain in the gemma cup and the parental plant is alive [5]. Following dispersal of gemmae from gemma cups by rain, the gemmae germinate in the presence of light and moisture, producing clonal offspring [6]. In land plants, the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates many aspects of dormancy and water balance [7]. Here, we demonstrate that ABA plays a central role in the control of gemma dormancy as transgenic M. polymorpha gemmae with reduced sensitivity to ABA fail to establish and/or maintain dormancy. Thus, the common ancestor of land plants used the ABA signaling module to regulate germination of progeny in response to environmental cues, with both gemmae and seeds being derived structures co-opting an ancestral response system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CELL PRESS , 2018. Vol. 28, no 22, p. 3691-3699.e3
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Botany
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URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-371870DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2018.10.018ISI: 000450614200032PubMedID: 30416060OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-371870DiVA, id: diva2:1275649
Funder
Australian Research Council, DP130100177Australian Research Council, DP160100892Swedish Research Council, 623-2010-6591Swedish Research Council, 2016-05180Swedish Research Council, 201604430Available from: 2019-01-07 Created: 2019-01-07 Last updated: 2019-01-07Bibliographically approved

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Eklund, D. MagnusLagercrantz, Ulf

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