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The T-cell pool is anergized in patients with multiple sclerosis in remission
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. (neurologi)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
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2009 (English)In: Immunology, ISSN 0019-2805, E-ISSN 1365-2567, Vol. 126, no 1, p. 92-101Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) is a complex autoimmune disease of the central nervous system with oscillating phases of relapse and remission. RRMS has been considered to be driven by T helper type 1 (Th1) lymphocytes but new data indicate the involvement of Th17 responses. In the present study, blood samples from patients (n=48) and healthy individuals (n=44) were evaluated for their immunological status. T cells from patients with RRMS expressed high levels of the activation marker CD28 (P<0.05) and secreted both interferon-gamma (CD8: P<0.05) and interleukin-17 upon polyclonal mitogen or myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antigen stimulation. However, T cells from patients with RRMS in remission, in contrast to relapse, had poor proliferative capacity (P<0.05) suggesting that they are controlled and kept in anergy. This anergy could be broken with CD28 stimulation that restored the T-cell replication. Furthermore, the patients with RRMS had normal levels of CD4(+) Foxp3(+) T regulatory cells but the frequency of Foxp3(+) cells lacking CD127 (interleukin-7 receptor) was lower in patients with MS (mean 12%) compared to healthy controls (mean 29%). Still, regulatory cells (CD25(+) sorted cells) from patients with RRMS displayed no difference in suppressive capacity. In conclusion, patients in relapse/remission demonstrate in vitro T-cell responses that are both Th1 and Th17 that, while in remission, appear to be controlled by tolerogenic mechanisms yet to be investigated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 126, no 1, p. 92-101
National Category
Neurology
Research subject
Neurology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-86968DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2567.2008.02881.xISI: 000261528300011PubMedID: 18624727OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-86968DiVA, id: diva2:127742
Available from: 2008-12-10 Created: 2008-12-10 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. CNS-Targeted Cell Therapy for Multiple Sclerosis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>CNS-Targeted Cell Therapy for Multiple Sclerosis
2010 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disorder of the central nervous system (CNS). In the current thesis, we have preformed an immunological investigation of patients with MS and developed an immunosuppressive cell therapy that could be beneficial for these patients.

MS has been considered to be driven by T helper type1 (Th1) lymphocytes but new data indicate the involvement of Th17 responses. T cells from patients with MS that were evaluated for immunological status secreted both interferon-γ and interleukin-17 upon stimulation. However, T cells from patients with MS in remission, in contrast to relapse, had poor proliferative capacity suggesting that they are controlled and kept in anergy.

T regulatory cells (Tregs) are important to maintain self-tolerance and the role of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Tregs in autoimmunity has been extensively investigated. We analyzed Tregs from patients with MS in relapse and remission by multicolor flow cytometry for the expression of CD3, CD4, IL2R (CD25), FoxP3 and the IL7R (CD127). Patients in relapse exhibited higher levels of FoxP3-positive Tregs lacking CD25 compared to healthy controls, indicating that Tregs might attempt to restrain immune activity during relapse.

In the murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model of MS, therapy with suppressive cells such as Tregs or mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) has proven beneficial. However, systemic administration of such cells may immunologically compromise the recipient and promote infections due to general immunosuppression. We hypothesized that suppressive cells can be equipped with a CNS-targeting receptor and be delivered intra-nasally to avoid systemic exposure. CD4+ T cells were modified with a lentiviral vector system to express a myelin oligodendrocyte (MOG)-targeting receptor in trans with the FoxP3 gene that drives Treg differentiation. Genetically engineered Tregs demonstrated suppressive capacity in vitro and localized to the brain and suppressed ongoing encephalomyelitis in vivo. Cured mice were rechallenged with an EAE-inducing inoculum but remained healthy.

MSCs are a heterogeneous population of stromal cells residing in most connective tissues and have the capacity to suppress effector cells of the immune system. MSCs were engineered to express MOG-targeting receptors using lentiviral vectors. Genetically engineered MSCs retained their suppressive capacity in vitro and successfully targeted the brain upon intranasal delivery. Engineered MSCs cured mice from disease symptoms and these mice were resistant to further EAE challenge. Encephalitic T cells isolated from cured mice displayed an anergic profile while peripheral T cells were still responsive to stimuli.

In conclusion, MS patients have peripheral CNS-reactive T cells of both Th1 and Th17 type that, while in remission, are kept in anergy. Also, MS patients in relapse exhibit increased levels of CD25 negative Tregs indicating an attempt to restrain immune activity. Finally, immunosuppressive cells can be genetically engineered to target CNS and efficiently suppress encephalomyelitis in an active EAE model upon intranasal delivery.

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2010. p. 59
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Medicine, ISSN 1651-6206 ; 608
Keyword
CAR, Targeting, Suppressive cells, Foxp3, Tregs
National Category
Immunology in the medical area
Research subject
Immunology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-132364 (URN)978-91-554-7918-3 (ISBN)
Public defence
2010-12-03, Rudbecksalen, Rudbecklaboratoriet, Dag Hammarskjöldsväg 20, Uppsala, 09:15 (English)
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Available from: 2010-11-12 Created: 2010-10-19 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved

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Tötterman, ThomasLoskog, Angelica S.

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