uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Pancreatic Cancer Following Acute Pancreatitis: A Population-based Matched Cohort Study
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden;Eskilstuna Cty Hosp, Dept Surg, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden.
Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.
Show others and affiliations
2018 (English)In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0002-9270, E-ISSN 1572-0241, Vol. 113, no 11, p. 1711-1719Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Acute pancreatitis is linked to pancreatic cancer, but the direction of this association is not fully elaborated.

METHODS: This was a population-based cohort study including all Swedish residents diagnosed with a first-time episode of acute pancreatitis between 1997 and 2013 and corresponding matched pancreatitis-free individuals from the general population. Hazard ratios for the association between acute pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer were estimated using multivariable Cox regression models.

RESULTS: Overall, 49,749 individuals with acute pancreatitis and 138,750 matched individuals without acute pancreatitis were followed up for 1,192,134 person-years (median 5.3 years). A total of 769 individuals developed pancreatic cancer, of whom 536 (69.7%) had a history of acute pancreatitis. The risk of pancreatic cancer was substantially increased during the first few years after a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis but declined gradually over time, reaching a level comparable to the pancreatitis-free population after >10 years of follow-up. In those with non-gallstone-related acute pancreatitis, the risk of pancreatic cancer declined to a level comparable to the pancreatitis-free population only when follow-up time was censored for a second episode of acute pancreatitis or a diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis. Increasing number of recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis was associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer.

CONCLUSION: These findings imply a delay in the diagnosis of pre-existing pancreatic cancer, if clinically presented as acute pancreatitis. Any association between non-gallstone-related acute pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer in the long-term (>10 years) could be mediated through recurrent acute pancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 113, no 11, p. 1711-1719
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-373215DOI: 10.1038/s41395-018-0255-9ISI: 000454017900023PubMedID: 30315287OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-373215DiVA, id: diva2:1278031
Funder
Swedish Society of MedicineAvailable from: 2019-01-11 Created: 2019-01-11 Last updated: 2019-01-11Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed
By organisation
Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD)
In the same journal
American Journal of Gastroenterology
Gastroenterology and Hepatology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 13 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf