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On the Detection of Supermassive Primordial Stars
Univ Portsmouth, Inst Cosmol & Gravitat, Portsmouth PO1 3FX, Hants, England.
Univ Portsmouth, Inst Cosmol & Gravitat, Portsmouth PO1 3FX, Hants, England;Univ Tokyo, UTIAS, Kavli IPMU WPI, Kashiwa, Chiba 2778583, Japan.
Univ Tokyo, Sch Sci, Dept Phys, Bunkyo Ku, Tokyo 1130033, Japan.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Observational Astronomy.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1096-2636
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2018 (English)In: Astrophysical Journal Letters, ISSN 2041-8205, E-ISSN 2041-8213, Vol. 869, no 2, article id L39Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The collapse of supermassive primordial stars in hot, atomically cooled halos may have given birth to the first quasars at z similar to 15-20. Recent numerical simulations of these rapidly accreting stars reveal that they are cool, red hypergiants shrouded by dense envelopes of pristine atomically cooled gas at 6000-8000 K, with luminosities L greater than or similar to 10(10) L-circle dot. Could such luminous but cool objects be detected as the first stage of quasar formation in future near-infrared (NIR) surveys? We have now calculated the spectra of supermassive primordial stars in their birth envelopes with the Cloudy code. We find that some of these stars will be visible to the James Webb Space Telescope at z less than or similar to 20 and that with modest gravitational lensing, Euclid and the Wide-Field Infrared Space Telescope could detect them out to z similar to 10-12. Rather than obscuring the star, its accretion envelope enhances its visibility in the NIR today by reprocessing its short-wavelength flux into photons that are just redward of the Lyman limit in the rest frame of the star.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 869, no 2, article id L39
Keywords [en]
black hole physics, dark ages, reionization, first stars, early universe, galaxies: formation, galaxies: high-redshift, quasars: general
National Category
Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-373227DOI: 10.3847/2041-8213/aaf80dISI: 000454318900002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-373227DiVA, id: diva2:1278362
Funder
EU, European Research Council, 339177Swedish National Space BoardGerman Research Foundation (DFG), SFB 881Available from: 2019-01-14 Created: 2019-01-14 Last updated: 2019-01-14Bibliographically approved

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